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#1【莎士比亚 】   Happy 450th Birthday, Shakespeare! 仲夏夜之梦             Go Back





Last modified on 05/12/14 02:09
        

#2  Happy 450th Birthday, Shakespeare!             Go Back
Mendelssohn - A Midsummer Night's Dream: Overture



莎翁的语言功力着实令人惊叹。


http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/A_Midsummer_Night's_Dream:

Act I
Four days will quickly steep themselves in nights;
Four nights will quickly dream away the time;
And then the moon, like to a silver bow
New bent in heaven, shall behold the night
Of our solemnities.
Hippolyta, scene i


But earthlier happy is the rose distill'd
Than that, which, withering on the virgin thorn,
Grows, lives, and dies, in single blessedness.
Theseus, scene i


For aught that ever I could read,
Could ever hear by tale or history,
The course of true love never did run smooth.
Lysander, scene i


O, hell! to choose love by another’s eye.
Hermia, scene i


Swift as a shadow, short as any dream,
Brief as the lightning in the collied night,
That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth,
And ere a man hath power to say, — Behold!
The jaws of darkness do devour it up:
So quick bright things come to confusion.
Lysander, scene i


Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing'd Cupid painted blind.
Helena, scene i

......
        

#3  Happy 450th Birthday, Shakespeare!             Go Back
Overture & Praeludium ("Julius Caesar")



Mark Antony的口才实在了得:

“Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him;
The evil that men do lives after them,
The good is oft interred with their bones,
So let it be with Caesar ... The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answered it ...
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest,
(For Brutus is an honourable man;
So are they all; all honourable men)
Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral ...
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man….
He hath brought many captives home to Rome,
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And, sure, he is an honourable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause:
What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?
O judgement! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason…. Bear with me;
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me”
---William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
        

#4  仲夏夜之梦 第一幕 第一场             Go Back
喜欢莎翁文字,忙里偷闲译着玩:


A Midsummer Night's Dream by Shakespeare 仲夏夜之梦 第一幕 第一场

ACT I
SCENE I. Athens. The palace of THESEUS.

第一幕
第一场 雅典 忒修斯宫殿


Enter THESEUS, HIPPOLYTA, PHILOSTRATE, and Attendants

忒修斯,希波吕忒,菲劳斯特莱特和侍从上

THESEUS
Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hour
Draws on apace; four happy days bring in
Another moon: but, O, methinks, how slow
This old moon wanes! she lingers my desires,
Like to a step-dame or a dowager
Long withering out a young man revenue.

忒修斯

啊,美丽的希波吕忒,我们喜结连理的时辰
即将来临;待开心的四天过后,一弯新月就会升起;
可我却觉得,天上的老月亮怎么迟迟不亏蚀!
她延误我的渴望,就像一个继母,一个老妪
一直消耗着本该属于年轻人继承的财富。


HIPPOLYTA
Four days will quickly steep themselves in night;
Four nights will quickly dream away the time;
And then the moon, like to a silver bow
New-bent in heaven, shall behold the night
Of our solemnities.

希波吕忒

这四个白昼很快就会陷入夜幕;
这四个夜晚也很快会消逝于梦;
然后,如银弓似的一钩新月
弯弯地挂在天穹,俯瞰
我们良宵之夜的庄严庆典。


THESEUS
Go, Philostrate,
Stir up the Athenian youth to merriments;
Awake the pert and nimble spirit of mirth;
Turn melancholy forth to funerals;
The pale companion is not for our pomp.

忒修斯

去吧,菲劳斯特莱特,
激荡起雅典青年的愉悦;
唤醒那活泼轻灵的欢乐精神;
把忧愁烦恼统统都赶入坟墓;
让这苍白的伴侣远离我们的盛典。


(Exit PHILOSTRATE 费劳斯特莱得下)

Hippolyta, I woo'd thee with my sword,
And won thy love, doing thee injuries;
But I will wed thee in another key,
With pomp, with triumph and with revelling.

希波吕忒, 我以剑求婚
用伤害你的方式赢得了你的芳心;
不过,我这次要换个花样,
我要以盛大的狂欢庆祝我们的婚礼。

Enter EGEUS, HERMIA, LYSANDER, and DEMETRIUS
伊吉斯、赫米娅、拉山德、狄米特律斯上

EGEUS
Happy be Theseus, our renowned duke!

伊吉斯
忒修斯,我们名声远扬的公爵,祝福你!


THESEUS
Thanks, good Egeus: what's the news with thee?

忒修斯
谢谢你,好伊吉斯。 你有什么事啊?

EGEUS
Full of vexation come I, with complaint
Against my child, my daughter Hermia.
Stand forth, Demetrius. My noble lord,
This man hath my consent to marry her.
Stand forth, Lysander: and my gracious duke,
This man hath bewitch'd the bosom of my child;
Thou, thou, Lysander, thou hast given her rhymes,
And interchanged love-tokens with my child:
Thou hast by moonlight at her window sung,
With feigning voice verses of feigning love,
And stolen the impression of her fantasy
With bracelets of thy hair, rings, gawds, conceits,
Knacks, trifles, nosegays, sweetmeats, messengers
Of strong prevailment in unharden'd youth:
With cunning hast thou filch'd my daughter's heart,
Turn'd her obedience, which is due to me,
To stubborn harshness: and, my gracious duke,
Be it so she; will not here before your grace
Consent to marry with Demetrius,
I beg the ancient privilege of Athens,
As she is mine, I may dispose of her:
Which shall be either to this gentleman
Or to her death, according to our law
Immediately provided in that case.

伊吉斯
我满心烦恼,来控告我的孩子,我女儿荷米亚。
狄米特律斯,请你上前来。
我尊贵的公爵,我同意这位先生娶我女儿。
拉山德,你也上前来:
我仁慈的公爵,这个家伙对我的孩子极尽蛊惑之能事。
你,你,拉山德,你给我女儿写诗,与她交换爱情信物,
还在月明之夜到她窗前,拿腔拿调,哼些个虚情假意的爱情诗篇,
你用自己头发编的手镯,还有戒指,小玩具,小珠宝,
和一些廉价小玩意,还有什么鲜花,蜜饯,
来打动一个稚嫩少女的心,
你狡猾地猎获了我女儿的心,
让原本对我言听计从的乖乖女变得桀骜不驯;
啊,我仁慈的公爵,
如果她继续自行其是,敢当着您的面拒绝嫁给狄米特律斯,
那么我请求行使雅典古老的特权,
她既是我女儿,我就有权处置她:
根据我们的法律,她要么嫁给这位先生,要么立即被处死。

THESEUS
What say you, Hermia? be advised fair maid:
To you your father should be as a god;
One that composed your beauties, yea, and one
To whom you are but as a form in wax
By him imprinted and within his power
To leave the figure or disfigure it.
Demetrius is a worthy gentleman.

忒修斯
荷米亚,你意下如何? 美丽的姑娘,你必须明白:
对你来说,你父亲就是神;
他赋你以美丽,你就如同他亲手雕成的蜡像,
是让它完好无损,还是破碎残缺,都是他的权力。
狄米特律斯是个值得托付终身的的绅士。


HERMIA
So is Lysander.

荷米亚
拉山德也值得我托付终身。

THESEUS
In himself he is;
But in this kind, wanting your father's voice,
The other must be held the worthier.

忒修斯
他本人是很不错;
但这件事的问题是,你父亲不允诺,
所以狄米特律斯就拔得头筹。


HERMIA
I would my father look'd but with my eyes.

荷米亚
我真希望我父亲能以我的视角看这件事。

THESEUS
Rather your eyes must with his judgment look.

忒修斯
你则应该向你父亲的观点看齐。

HERMIA
I do entreat your grace to pardon me.
I know not by what power I am made bold,
Nor how it may concern my modesty,
In such a presence here to plead my thoughts;
But I beseech your grace that I may know
The worst that may befall me in this case,
If I refuse to wed Demetrius.

荷米亚
我请求您施恩宽恕我。
我不知道是什么力量,让我如此大胆地在此诉说自己的想法,
也不知道这么做将会如何影响我谦逊的名声;
但我恳求您告诉我,
如果我拒绝嫁给狄米特律斯,
那么降临到我头上的最坏的厄运将是什么呢?

THESEUS
Either to die the death or to abjure
For ever the society of men.
Therefore, fair Hermia, question your desires;
Know of your youth, examine well your blood,
Whether, if you yield not to your father's choice,
You can endure the livery of a nun,
For aye to be in shady cloister mew'd,
To live a barren sister all your life,
Chanting faint hymns to the cold fruitless moon.
Thrice-blessed they that master so their blood,
To undergo such maiden pilgrimage;
But earthlier happy is the rose distill'd,
Than that which withering on the virgin thorn
Grows, lives and dies in single blessedness.

忒修斯
你要么被处死,要么与天下男人永世隔绝。
所以啊,美丽的荷米亚,你当仔细斟酌你的愿望;
想想你的花季青春,好好权衡你血脉中的澎湃情感,
倘若你违背你父亲的决定,
你是否能忍受一个修女的生活,
终生幽禁于修道院,一辈子无子无嗣,
对着空寂的寒月气息微弱地吟诵圣歌。
那些能够遏制七情六欲的一世处女,自然得到额外的祝福;
但相比在贞洁的花刺上枯萎,在孤独的祝福里活着又死去的玫瑰,
被提炼过的玫瑰会享受到更多俗世的欢愉。

HERMIA
So will I grow, so live, so die, my lord,
Ere I will my virgin patent up
Unto his lordship, whose unwished yoke
My soul consents not to give sovereignty.

荷米亚
尊贵的公爵,那么我宁可自生自灭,
也不把自己的贞洁献给他,
也不愿受他束缚,受他主宰。


THESEUS
Take time to pause; and, by the next new moon--
The sealing-day betwixt my love and me,
For everlasting bond of fellowship--
Upon that day either prepare to die
For disobedience to your father's will,
Or else to wed Demetrius, as he would;
Or on Diana's altar to protest
For aye austerity and single life.

忒修斯
先别匆匆做决定;且待下一弯新月升起时---
我和我的心上人届时将喜结良缘,携手到老 ---
到了那天,你再做最后的抉择
你若违背父愿,就要准备赴死;不然你须顺从乃父,嫁给狄米特律斯;
你也可以在戴安娜的圣坛前,发誓永守贞洁,独处一生。

DEMETRIUS
Relent, sweet Hermia: and, Lysander, yield
Thy crazed title to my certain right.

狄米特律斯
可爱的荷米亚,顺从吧;
拉山德,我更有资格娶她,你还是别跟我一争高低了。

LYSANDER
You have her father's love, Demetrius;
Let me have Hermia's: do you marry him.

拉山德
狄米特律斯,她父亲对你情有独钟;
那就让荷米亚爱我吧;而你呢,跟她父亲成亲就好了。

EGEUS
Scornful Lysander! true, he hath my love,
And what is mine my love shall render him.
And she is mine, and all my right of her
I do estate unto Demetrius.

伊吉斯
冷嘲热讽的拉山德!没错,我就是喜欢他,
凡我所有,皆可赠他。
女儿是我的,我对她的所有权,全部转给狄米特律斯。

LYSANDER
I am, my lord, as well derived as he,
As well possess'd; my love is more than his;
My fortunes every way as fairly rank'd,
If not with vantage, as Demetrius';
And, which is more than all these boasts can be,
I am beloved of beauteous Hermia:
Why should not I then prosecute my right?
Demetrius, I'll avouch it to his head,
Made love to Nedar's daughter, Helena,
And won her soul; and she, sweet lady, dotes,
Devoutly dotes, dotes in idolatry,
Upon this spotted and inconstant man.

拉山德
尊贵的公爵,较之狄米特律斯,我同样出身高尚,
同样家产富足,并且我更爱荷米亚;
我的前程即使不更胜一筹,也至少同样锦绣灿烂;
比这些都更值得炫耀的是,
美丽的荷米亚独独钟情于我:
我为什么不能行使我的权力呢?
这个狄米特律斯, 我要当着他的面指证,
他向奈达的女儿海丽娜大献殷勤,赢得了她的芳心;
那美丽的姑娘,一片痴情,
全心全意地爱着,偶像般崇拜着这劣迹斑斑见异思迁的男人。

THESEUS
I must confess that I have heard so much,
And with Demetrius thought to have spoke thereof;
But, being over-full of self-affairs,
My mind did lose it. But, Demetrius, come;
And come, Egeus; you shall go with me,
I have some private schooling for you both.
For you, fair Hermia, look you arm yourself
To fit your fancies to your father's will;
Or else the law of Athens yields you up--
Which by no means we may extenuate--
To death, or to a vow of single life.
Come, my Hippolyta: what cheer, my love?
Demetrius and Egeus, go along:
I must employ you in some business
Against our nuptial and confer with you
Of something nearly that concerns yourselves.

忒修斯
我得承认,我也听到过一些风言风语,
曾打算同狄米特律斯谈谈;
但是我忙于处理私人事务,就没顾上这件事。
来,狄米特律斯,来,伊吉斯,你们俩都跟我来,
我想私下指点指点二位。
美丽的荷米亚,你呢,要做好准备,
让自己的浪漫情思合乎令尊的意愿;
不然,雅典的律条可不留情---
我们无论如何都不能从轻处置---
你要么被处死,要么发誓终生独身。
来,我的希波莉塔: 我爱,你好吗?
狄米特律斯和伊吉斯,你们也一起跟我来:
我必须差你们为我们的婚礼帮点忙,
同时跟你们商量下与二位关系密切的事情。

EGEUS
With duty and desire we follow you.

伊吉斯
大人,我们欣然奉命跟从。

Exeunt all but LYSANDER and HERMIA

除拉山德和荷米亚,皆退场

LYSANDER
How now, my love! why is your cheek so pale?
How chance the roses there do fade so fast?

拉山德
我爱,怎么回事? 你的面颊为何如此苍白?
那上面的玫瑰红晕怎么这么快就消褪了?

HERMIA
Belike for want of rain, which I could well
Beteem them from the tempest of my eyes.

荷米亚
大概雨水匮乏,但我眼中奔涌而出的暴雨
可以浇灌它们。


LYSANDER
Ay me! for aught that I could ever read,
Could ever hear by tale or history,
The course of true love never did run smooth;
But, either it was different in blood,--

拉山德
唉!我所读过的书,听过的故事或历史,
都说爱情之路并非一帆风顺;
像是不门当户对,--

HERMIA
O cross! too high to be enthrall'd to low.

荷米亚
鸿沟啊!贵族怎能屈身与平民结合。

LYSANDER
Or else misgraffed in respect of years,--

拉山德
又或者年龄不匹配,--

HERMIA
O spite! too old to be engaged to young.

荷米亚
可恶啊!衰老之躯哪能与黛绿年华同床共寝。

LYSANDER
Or else it stood upon the choice of friends,--

拉山德
还有的被朋友观点所左右,---

HERMIA
O hell! to choose love by another's eyes.

荷米亚
见鬼啊!竟以他人的眼光选择爱情。

LYSANDER
Or, if there were a sympathy in choice,
War, death, or sickness did lay siege to it,
Making it momentany as a sound,
Swift as a shadow, short as any dream;
Brief as the lightning in the collied night,
That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth,
And ere a man hath power to say 'Behold!'
The jaws of darkness do devour it up:
So quick bright things come to confusion.

拉山德
又或者,即便两人侥幸如愿所偿,
可在战争、死亡、和疾病的重重围困下,
爱情也如声音、影子、梦幻般稍纵即逝;
短暂的爱情,就如同暗夜里的闪电,
在一瞬间,照亮天空和大地,
当人们还没来得及说出“看!”字,
黑暗就合上下巴,把它吞噬了:
辉煌之事物总是这么快就以混沌告终。

HERMIA
If then true lovers have been ever cross'd,
It stands as an edict in destiny:
Then let us teach our trial patience,
Because it is a customary cross,
As due to love as thoughts and dreams and sighs,
Wishes and tears, poor fancy's followers.

荷米亚
倘若真心相爱总受磨难
已成命运的定律,
那就让我们学会忍耐吧,
因为磨难不可避免,
正如思绪、梦幻、叹息、期望和泪水,
总与可怜的爱情梦幻相随相行。

LYSANDER
A good persuasion: therefore, hear me, Hermia.
I have a widow aunt, a dowager
Of great revenue, and she hath no child:
From Athens is her house remote seven leagues;
And she respects me as her only son.
There, gentle Hermia, may I marry thee;
And to that place the sharp Athenian law
Cannot pursue us. If thou lovest me then,
Steal forth thy father's house to-morrow night;
And in the wood, a league without the town,
Where I did meet thee once with Helena,
To do observance to a morn of May,
There will I stay for thee.

拉山德
言之有理。那么,荷米亚,就听我的吧。
我有个守寡的姑姑,非常有钱,却无子无嗣。
她的住宅距雅典二十一英里,
她待我就像她的独子一般。
温柔的荷米亚,我们可以在那儿结婚,
雅典的苛刻律法鞭长莫及。
如果你爱我,那么明晚就从你父亲家溜出来;
城外三英里处有片林子,
我就是在那儿邂逅你同海丽娜的,那是欢庆五朔节的一个早晨。
我会在林子里等你,不见不散。

HERMIA
My good Lysander!
I swear to thee, by Cupid's strongest bow,
By his best arrow with the golden head,
By the simplicity of Venus' doves,
By that which knitteth souls and prospers loves,
And by that fire which burn'd the Carthage queen,
When the false Troyan under sail was seen,
By all the vows that ever men have broke,
In number more than ever women spoke,
In that same place thou hast appointed me,
To-morrow truly will I meet with thee.

荷米亚
我的好拉山德!
以丘比特最强劲的弓弩,最锋利的金箭头,
以维纳斯的白鸽子的纯真,
以交织灵魂蓬勃爱情的神,
以目睹特罗伊负心郎登船扬帆
而自戕的迦太基女王所殉身的烈焰,
以男人们所背弃的一切诺言,
它们远远多过女人们的誓言,
我向你起誓,我明天一定到你指定的地点,
我们不见不散。

LYSANDER
Keep promise, love. Look, here comes Helena.

拉山德
爱人,请守约。看,海丽娜来了。

Enter HELENA 海丽娜上

HERMIA
God speed fair Helena! whither away?

荷米亚
美丽的海丽娜,你好! 你上哪儿去?

HELENA
Call you me fair? that fair again unsay.
Demetrius loves your fair: O happy fair!
Your eyes are lode-stars; and your tongue's sweet air
More tuneable than lark to shepherd's ear,
When wheat is green, when hawthorn buds appear.
Sickness is catching: O, were favour so,
Yours would I catch, fair Hermia, ere I go;
My ear should catch your voice, my eye your eye,
My tongue should catch your tongue's sweet melody.
Were the world mine, Demetrius being bated,
The rest I'd give to be to you translated.
O, teach me how you look, and with what art
You sway the motion of Demetrius' heart.

海丽娜
你说我美丽?收回你的话吧。
狄米特律斯爱慕你的美丽,哦,多么快乐的美丽!
你的眼睛是明亮的北极星;你的声音那么甜蜜蜜
比麦苗青青山楂吐蕾时,牧羊人耳畔回旋
的百灵鸟的啁啾更加动听婉转。
疾病是会传染的,啊,要是美丽也能够传染。
美丽的荷米亚,我离去前,真想染上你迷人的容颜。
让你的声音感染我的双耳,让你的明眸感染我的眼,
让你谈吐的甜美旋律感染我的舌尖。
倘若这世界属于我,我但求掌控狄米特律斯,
其余的一切皆可放弃,只要我能化身为你。
啊,请教教我怎样才能像你那般美丽,
又如何施技让狄米特律斯情乱意迷。

HERMIA
I frown upon him, yet he loves me still.

荷米亚
我对他皱眉相向,他却爱我如故。

HELENA
O that your frowns would teach my smiles such skill!

海丽娜
啊,但愿我的微笑能学到你蹙眉的神效!

HERMIA
I give him curses, yet he gives me love.

荷米亚
我口出诅咒,他却以爱回报。

HELENA
O that my prayers could such affection move!

海丽娜
啊,但愿我的祈祷能让他萌生爱恋!

HERMIA
The more I hate, the more he follows me.

荷米亚
我越恨他,他越是形影相随。

HELENA
The more I love, the more he hateth me.

海丽娜
我爱他愈多,他恨我愈多。

HERMIA
His folly, Helena, is no fault of mine.

荷米亚
海丽娜,他的愚蠢,可不是我的过错。


HELENA
None, but your beauty: would that fault were mine!

海丽娜
过错不在你,而在于你的美丽,但愿我有那样的过错!

HERMIA
Take comfort: he no more shall see my face;
Lysander and myself will fly this place.
Before the time I did Lysander see,
Seem'd Athens as a paradise to me:
O, then, what graces in my love do dwell,
That he hath turn'd a heaven unto a hell!


荷米亚
你放心,他再也看不到我的面庞;
拉山德和我就要远走他乡。
在我遇见拉山德之前,
雅典对我无异于天堂,
啊,神力居于我爱人之躯,
他将天堂变为地狱!


LYSANDER
Helen, to you our minds we will unfold:
To-morrow night, when Phoebe doth behold
Her silver visage in the watery glass,
Decking with liquid pearl the bladed grass,
A time that lovers' flights doth still conceal,
Through Athens' gates have we devised to steal.

拉山德
海丽娜,我们对你敞开心胸。
明晚,当月亮凝视着她镜波之上的银色姣容,
当草叶上缀满晶莹露珠,
那正是恋人们借着夜幕
逃离的好时辰,
我们计划那时溜出雅典城门。

HERMIA
And in the wood, where often you and I
Upon faint primrose-beds were wont to lie,
Emptying our bosoms of their counsel sweet,
There my Lysander and myself shall meet;
And thence from Athens turn away our eyes,
To seek new friends and stranger companies.
Farewell, sweet playfellow: pray thou for us;
And good luck grant thee thy Demetrius!
Keep word, Lysander: we must starve our sight
From lovers' food till morrow deep midnight.

荷米亚
在那片林子里,你我曾常常
躺在淡淡的樱草花上,
倾诉我们心中甜蜜的闺思心曲,
我将在那儿和我的拉山德相聚;
然后自那里挥手告别雅典,
去寻找新朋友,与陌生人作伴。
再会,我可爱的玩伴,请为我们祷祈,
我祝你如愿赢得狄米特律斯!
拉山德,请守约。我们必须暂时禁忍
爱的视线,受别离之苦,直到明晚子夜时分。


LYSANDER
I will, my Hermia.

拉山德
我会的,我的荷米亚。

(Exit HERMIA 荷米亚下 )

Helena, adieu:
As you on him, Demetrius dote on you!

再见,海丽娜,
愿狄米特律斯深深爱你,如同你爱他那样!

(Exit 拉山德下)



HELENA
How happy some o'er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know:
And as he errs, doting on Hermia's eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities:
Things base and vile, folding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind;
And therefore is wing'd Cupid painted blind:
Nor hath Love's mind of any judgement taste;
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste:
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguiled.
As waggish boys in game themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjured every where:
For ere Demetrius look'd on Hermia's eyne,
He hail'd down oaths that he was only mine;
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolved, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia's flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense:
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.


海丽娜
同其他人相比,有的人多么好福气!
雅典城里谁都认为我像她一样美丽。
但有何用?狄米特律斯却所见不同,
别人都知道的事,唯独他糊涂懵懂。
他错在迷恋荷米亚那双美丽的眼睛,
而我之错,在于一味仰慕他的性情:
那些低俗恶劣的品质,也无关紧要,
爱情将瑕疵谬误也美化得完美崇高。
爱情不是眼睛,而是心与心的对视,
因此插着翅膀的丘比特被画成瞎子。
置身爱情之中判断力常常大幅下降,
他生双翅眼失明,做事草率又匆忙。
所以,传说爱情其实就是童稚少年,
因为在做决定时,他常常上当受骗。
正如调皮的男孩子们玩耍时发假誓,
小爱神他走到哪里都把诺言当儿戏。
当狄米特律斯尚不识荷米亚之美目,
他的誓言坠如冰雹,说他非我莫属;
一旦冰雹感受到荷米亚的些许热气,
他便融化了,无数誓言也随之遁逸。
我要赶去告诉他荷米亚将远走天涯,
那他明晚一定会赶到林子里追寻她;
倘若他会因此感谢我向他报信通风,
那我为此付出的代价也实在太沉重。
但若能再睹他离去同返回时的面庞,
那我所受到的痛苦也算是有所补偿。

Exit 下



云天译


Last modified on 08/17/14 01:57
        

#5  《仲夏夜之梦》中的典故----不幸的蒂朵             Go Back


Aeneas recounting the Trojan War to Dido, a painting by Pierre-Narcisse Guérin. This scene is taken from Virgil's Aeneid, where Dido falls in love with, only to be left by, the Trojan hero Aeneas.


《仲夏夜之梦》第一幕第一场中,荷米亚向拉山德发誓赴约,
“And by that fire which burn'd the Carthage queen,
When the false Troyan under sail was seen”

Carthage queen 迦太基女王即为蒂朵。蒂朵与特洛伊英雄埃涅阿斯相爱,但在他乘船离去时,蒂朵伤心欲绝,为自己筑起火葬台,随后自杀身亡。


这个古希腊爱情悲剧被英国作曲珀塞尔谱写成歌剧《狄朵与埃涅阿斯》。其中的唱段《Dido's Lament 蒂朵的挽歌》哀伤之至。

Henry Purcell - Dido and Aeneas - Dido's lament



Recitative
Thy hand, Belinda, darkness shades me,
On thy bosom let me rest,
More I would, but Death invades me;
Death is now a welcome guest.
Aria
When I am laid, am laid in earth, May my wrongs create
No trouble, no trouble in thy breast;
Remember me, remember me, but ah! forget my fate.
Remember me, but ah! forget my fate.


以下翻译来自网上《狄朵與埃涅阿斯》中文全譯劇本:


蒂朵:

贝琳达,伸出妳的手吧,黑暗已正籠罩了我的眼前,
讓我在妳的懷中安息吧.
死亡如今是受到歡迎的賓客.
當我被埋葬時,但願我所犯下的錯誤不會擾亂了妳的心,
記得我,但是哦!忘掉我所受的命運


from wiki:

狄多与埃涅阿斯(Dido and Aeneas),剧情取自古罗马诗人维吉尔的诗篇,诉说古希腊传说中的一段故事:特洛伊失陷后,王子埃涅阿斯在迦太基避难,与迦太基的狄多女王相爱。但女巫传神的旨意,要埃涅阿斯回国去重建家业。不可抗拒的命运感,迫使埃涅阿斯抛狄多而去。狄多心碎而自尽,临终前唱出“当我被埋在地下”(唱片上的第16段),庄重而平静,却真正的哀婉动人,是一首非常著名的唱段。在西方歌剧史上,这部演出时间不足一个小时的三幕歌剧,有着极其重要的地位,它被认为是从蒙特威尔第到格鲁克之间的一个里程碑。
        

#6  Re: 《仲夏夜之梦》中的典故----不幸的蒂朵             Go Back
普赛尔的这部名剧,没有细心听过。刚听了这个唱段,的确是很动人的。

这些古希腊的英雄和爱情的传奇故事,从年轻时候就很感动入迷,至今回味,仍然感动。人要真爱艺术,也许就会少不少世俗的烦恼。


云天 wrote: (5/12/2014 2:7)


Aeneas recounting the Trojan War to Dido, a painting by Pierre-Narcisse Guérin. This scene is taken from Virgil's Aeneid, where Dido falls in love with, only to be left by, the Trojan hero Aeneas.


《仲夏夜之梦》第一幕第一场中,荷米亚向拉山德发誓赴约,
“And by that fire which burn'd the Carthage queen,
When the false Troyan under sail was seen”

Carthage queen 迦太基女王即为蒂朵。蒂朵与特洛伊英雄埃涅阿斯相爱,但在他乘船离去时,蒂朵伤心欲绝,为自己筑起火葬台,随后自杀身亡。


这个古希腊爱情悲剧被英国作曲珀塞尔谱写成歌剧《狄朵与埃涅阿斯》。其中的唱段《Dido's Lament 蒂朵的挽歌》哀伤之至。

Henry Purcell - Dido and Aeneas - Dido's lament



Recitative
Thy hand, Belinda, darkness shades me,
On thy bosom let me rest,
More I would, but Death invades me;
Death is now a welcome guest.
Aria
When I am laid, am laid in earth, May my wrongs create
No trouble, no trouble in thy breast;
Remember me, remember me, but ah! forget my fate.
Remember me, but ah! forget my fate.


以下翻译来自网上《狄朵與埃涅阿斯》中文全譯劇本:


蒂朵:

贝琳达,伸出妳的手吧,黑暗已正籠罩了我的眼前,
讓我在妳的懷中安息吧.
死亡如今是受到歡迎的賓客.
當我被埋葬時,但願我所犯下的錯誤不會擾亂了妳的心,
記得我,但是哦!忘掉我所受的命運


from wiki:

狄多与埃涅阿斯(Dido and Aeneas),剧情取自古罗马诗人维吉尔的诗篇,诉说古希腊传说中的一段故事:特洛伊失陷后,王子埃涅阿斯在迦太基避难,与迦太基的狄多女王相爱。但女巫传神的旨意,要埃涅阿斯回国去重建家业。不可抗拒的命运感,迫使埃涅阿斯抛狄多而去。狄多心碎而自尽,临终前唱出“当我被埋在地下”(唱片上的第16段),庄重而平静,却真正的哀婉动人,是一首非常著名的唱段。在西方歌剧史上,这部演出时间不足一个小时的三幕歌剧,有着极其重要的地位,它被认为是从蒙特威尔第到格鲁克之间的一个里程碑。

--*--*--*--*--*--*--*--*--*--*--*
自得其乐
        

#7  Happy 450th Birthday, Shakespeare! 仲夏夜之梦             Go Back
"普赛尔的这部名剧", 的确”动人“。 或许以后会单开一线。

西方文学里时常会提到希腊神话,借莎翁的剧,趁机贴一下。
站长是”真爱艺术“。像我这样不懂艺术的,也能“自得其乐”呢。

"The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls." -- by Pablo Picasso


Last modified on 05/18/14 00:48
        

#8  仲夏夜之梦 第一幕 第二场             Go Back
Act I. SCENE II. Athens. QUINCE'S house.

第一幕 第二场 雅典 昆斯的家

Enter QUINCE, SNUG, BOTTOM, FLUTE, SNOUT, and STARVELING

昆斯,斯纳格,波特穆,弗鲁特,斯诺特,斯达佛凌上

QUINCE
Is all our company here?

昆斯
大伙都到了吗?

BOTTOM
You were best to call them generally, man by man,
according to the scrip.

波特穆
你最好照着名单挨个大致点下名。

QUINCE
Here is the scroll of every man's name, which is
thought fit, through all Athens, to play in our
interlude before the duke and the duchess, on his
wedding-day at night.

昆斯
我们在公爵和公爵夫人婚礼当晚表演短剧的人,都在这个花名册上,当中每个人都是从整个雅典城甄选出来最合适的。

BOTTOM
First, good Peter Quince, say what the play treats
on, then read the names of the actors, and so grow
to a point.

波特穆
好彼得。昆斯,你先说说这出戏演的是啥,再念下演员名字。还是说正事儿吧。

QUINCE
Marry, our play is-- The most lamentable comedy, and
most cruel death of Pyramus and Thisby.

昆斯
好的,我们这出戏是--- 《至哀喜剧以及皮拉摩斯和提斯柏的最残酷的死》。


BOTTOM
A very good piece of work, I assure you, and a
merry. Now, good Peter Quince, call forth your
actors by the scroll. Masters, spread yourselves.

波特穆
我跟你打包票,这出戏非常棒,而且特别有趣。好彼得。昆斯,那现在就照着名单点名吧。师傅们,请散开点。

QUINCE
Answer as I call you. Nick Bottom, the weaver.

昆斯
我点到名时,请应声。尼克。波特穆,织布工。

BOTTOM
Ready. Name what part I am for, and proceed.

波特穆
在。请先告知派给我啥角色,再接着点名。

QUINCE
You, Nick Bottom, are set down for Pyramus.

昆斯
你,尼克。波特穆,扮演皮拉摩斯。

BOTTOM
What is Pyramus? a lover, or a tyrant?

波特穆
皮拉摩斯是做啥的? 是情哥哥,还是霸主?

QUINCE
A lover, that kills himself most gallant for love.

昆斯
是个情哥哥,勇敢地以身殉情。

BOTTOM
That will ask some tears in the true performing of
it: if I do it, let the audience look to their
eyes; I will move storms, I will condole in some
measure. To the rest: yet my chief humour is for a
tyrant: I could play Ercles rarely, or a part to
tear a cat in, to make all split.
The raging rocks
And shivering shocks
Shall break the locks
Of prison gates;
And Phibbus' car
Shall shine from far
And make and mar
The foolish Fates.
This was lofty! Now name the rest of the players.
This is Ercles' vein, a tyrant's vein; a lover is
more condoling.

波特穆
那上场表演时得动真格的,掉几滴泪。
如果我演,观众可要管住他们的眼;
我会让看客涕泪俱下,哭声动天。
你接着点名哈;我最大的奢好是扮霸主,
我演赫拉克勒斯绝对出彩,
或者大吼大叫的角色,保证让人闻声丧胆。
山石狂怒摇撼
击穿牢狱门扇;
阳光穿越苍天
命运俯首低颔。
这多么高昂!现在宣布其他演员吧。
这是赫拉克勒斯的气势,霸主的气势;
情哥哥嘛,太多愁善感。

QUINCE
Francis Flute, the bellows-mender.

昆斯
弗朗西斯。弗鲁特, 修风箱的。

FLUTE
Here, Peter Quince.

弗鲁特
在,彼得。昆斯。

QUINCE
Flute, you must take Thisby on you.

昆斯
弗鲁特,提斯柏非你莫属。

FLUTE
What is Thisby? a wandering knight?

弗鲁特
提斯柏是啥人?漫游骑士?

QUINCE
It is the lady that Pyramus must love.

昆斯
就是皮拉摩斯要爱的女孩。

FLUTE
Nay, faith, let me not play a woman; I have a beard coming.

弗鲁特
嘿,可甭让我扮女人。我正长胡子呢。

QUINCE
That's all one: you shall play it in a mask, and
you may speak as small as you will.

昆斯
没关系。你反正要戴面具表演,
你可以压低声音讲话。

BOTTOM
An I may hide my face, let me play Thisby too, I'll
speak in a monstrous little voice. 'Thisne,
Thisne;' 'Ah, Pyramus, lover dear! thy Thisby dear,
and lady dear!'

波特穆
那我把脸遮住,也可以扮成提斯柏,
说起话来柔声细语。
咱先当皮拉摩斯,"提斯柏,提斯柏,”
再摇身一变做提斯柏,“啊,皮拉摩斯,我亲爱的!
我是你的提斯柏,你心爱的姑娘!”

QUINCE
No, no; you must play Pyramus: and, Flute, you Thisby.

昆斯
绝对不行。你非得扮皮拉摩斯;
弗鲁特,你演提斯柏。

BOTTOM
Well, proceed.

波特穆
好吧,请继续分派任务。

QUINCE
Robin Starveling, the tailor.

昆斯
罗宾。斯塔佛林,裁缝。


STARVELING
Here, Peter Quince.

斯塔佛林
在,彼得。昆斯。

QUINCE
Robin Starveling, you must play Thisby's mother.
Tom Snout, the tinker.

昆斯
罗宾。斯塔佛林,你必须出演提斯柏的母亲。
汤姆。斯诺特,补锅匠。

SNOUT
Here, Peter Quince.

斯诺特
在,彼得。昆斯。

QUINCE
You, Pyramus' father: myself, Thisby's father:
Snug, the joiner; you, the lion's part: and, I
hope, here is a play fitted.

昆斯
你演皮拉摩斯的父亲;我自个演提斯柏的老爸。
斯纳格, 小木匠。你扮狮子。
希望这出戏就算分派好了。

SNUG
Have you the lion's part written? pray you, if it
be, give it me, for I am slow of study.

斯纳格
狮子那部分台词写好了吗?
如果写好了,就请先让我瞧瞧,因为我学东西慢得一塌糊涂。

QUINCE
You may do it extempore, for it is nothing but roaring.

昆斯
你只需临场发挥,到时吼几声就行了。


BOTTOM
Let me play the lion too: I will roar, that I will
do any man's heart good to hear me; I will roar,
that I will make the duke say 'Let him roar again,
let him roar again.'

波特穆
我也想扮狮子:我高声一吼,
所有观众听了都会心情振奋,
公爵大人也会连连称道,
“让他接着吼,让他接着吼。”

QUINCE
An you should do it too terribly, you would fright
the duchess and the ladies, that they would shriek;
and that were enough to hang us all.

昆斯
你吼起来太可怕了,会吓坏公爵夫人和太太们,
弄得她们尖叫大叫。
那么一来我们这伙人可都得上绞刑架了。

ALL
That would hang us, every mother's son.

众人
那我们大家伙都得被吊死,每个母亲的儿子都活不成。

BOTTOM
I grant you, friends, if that you should fright the
ladies out of their wits, they would have no more
discretion but to hang us: but I will aggravate my
voice so that I will roar you as gently as any
sucking dove; I will roar you an 'twere any
nightingale.

波特穆
听我说,朋友们,
如果你们把女士们吓得失魂落魄,
她们肯定不假思索就把我们吊死。
但我会尽量压低声音吼叫,
就像吸奶的乳鸽一样柔弱;
像林间的夜莺般婉转悦耳。


QUINCE
You can play no part but Pyramus; for Pyramus is a
sweet-faced man; a proper man, as one shall see in a
summer's day; a most lovely gentleman-like man:
therefore you must needs play Pyramus.

昆斯
除了皮拉摩斯,别的角色你就甭想了。
因为皮拉摩斯长相俊美,是夏天时人们会看到的那种体面人,
他最具可爱的绅士风度,所以你必须出演皮拉摩斯。

BOTTOM
Well, I will undertake it. What beard were I best
to play it in?

波特穆
好,我听你的。
那我这个角色什么样的胡须最合适呢?

QUINCE
Why, what you will.

昆斯
随你便。

BOTTOM
I will discharge it in either your straw-colour
beard, your orange-tawny beard, your purple-in-grain
beard, or your French-crown-colour beard, your
perfect yellow.

波特穆
你的稻草黄胡须,橙褐色胡须,酱紫色胡须,或者法国金币那种纯黄色胡须,都适合我的角色。

QUINCE
Some of your French crowns have no hair at all, and
then you will play bare-faced. But, masters, here
are your parts: and I am to entreat you, request
you and desire you, to con them by to-morrow night;
and meet me in the palace wood, a mile without the
town, by moonlight; there will we rehearse, for if
we meet in the city, we shall be dogged with
company, and our devices known. In the meantime I
will draw a bill of properties, such as our play
wants. I pray you, fail me not.

昆斯
有些法国人根本不长胡须,
所以你演出时脸上要剃得光溜溜的。
师傅们,这是你们的台词。
我恳求你们,要求你们, 拜求你们,
在明晚之前要记得烂熟。
咱们到时借着月光,在城外一英里的宫苑林子里碰面。就在那儿排练。
如果咱们在城里聚合,就会有人跟着,剧情就泄漏了。
同时,我会开张演戏用的道具清单。
大伙可别让我下不了台。

BOTTOM
We will meet; and there we may rehearse most
obscenely and courageously. Take pains; be perfect: adieu.

波特穆
我们到时见。大家在那儿排练要放得开,鼓足勇气。
多下功夫,力求完美。再见。

QUINCE
At the duke's oak we meet.

昆斯
在公爵林子里的橡树下碰面。

BOTTOM
Enough; hold or cut bow-strings.

波特穆
就这样吧。请按时赴约,不然就再也别露面了。

Exeunt 退场


云天译



译注:
BOTTOM
Enough; hold or cut bow-strings.

“hold or cut bow-strings”, 具体何意,说法不一。 参见维基:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Bottom

本人的翻译采用"Be present at the rehearsal, or quit the troupe." 之解读。
        

#9  《仲夏夜之梦》中的典故             Go Back
《仲夏夜之梦》中的典故----皮拉摩斯和提斯柏的悲剧故事



Thisbe by John William Waterhouse, 1909.




《仲夏夜之梦》第一幕第二场中昆斯说,“Marry, our play is-- The most lamentable comedy, and most cruel death of Pyramus and Thisby.”

皮拉摩斯和提斯柏的悲剧故事最先出现在奥维德的《变形记》中。莎翁的《罗密欧与朱丽叶》为同类故事。

在故事中,皮拉摩斯的血将白色的桑椹染成了红色。

from wiki:

Pyramus and Thisbē are a pair of ill-fated lovers whose story forms part of Ovid's Metamorphoses. The story has since been retold by many authors.

In the Ovidian version, Pyramus and Thisbe is the story of two lovers in the city of Babylon who occupy connected houses/walls, forbidden by their parents to be wed, because of their parents' rivalry. Through a crack in one of the walls, they whisper their love for each other. They arrange to meet near Ninus' tomb under a mulberry tree and state their feelings for each other. Thisbe arrives first, but upon seeing a lioness with a mouth bloody from a recent kill, she flees, leaving behind her veils. When Pyramus arrives he is horrified at the sight of Thisbe's veil, assuming that a fierce beast had killed her. Pyramus kills himself, falling on his sword in proper Roman fashion, and in turn splashing blood on the white mulberry leaves. Pyramus' blood stains the white mulberry fruits, turning them dark. Thisbe returns, eager to tell Pyramus what had happened to her, but she finds Pyramus' dead body under the shade of the mulberry tree. Thisbe, after a brief period of mourning, stabs herself with the same sword. In the end, the gods listen to Thisbe's lament, and forever change the colour of the mulberry fruits into the stained colour to honour the forbidden love.


奥维德《变形记》英译本:
http://tikaboo.com/library/Ovid-Metamorphosis.pdf
page 183: The Death of Pyramus


《血的桑椹》
作者:林清玄

在遥远的梦一般的巴比伦城,隔着一道墙住着匹勒姆斯和西丝比,匹勒姆斯是全城最英俊的少年,西丝比则是全城最美丽的少女。

隔着古希腊那高大而坚固的石墙,他们一起长大,并且只是对望一眼就互相深深牵动对方的心,他们的爱在墙的两边燃烧。可惜,他们的爱却遭到双方父母的反对,使他们站在墙边的时候都感到心碎。

但热恋中的男女总是有方法传递他们的讯息,匹勒姆斯与西丝比共同在那道隔开两家的墙上找到一丝裂缝,那条裂缝小到从来没有被人发现,甚至伸不进一根小指头。可是对匹勒姆斯与西丝比已经足够让他们倾诉深切的爱,并传达流动着深情的眼神。

他们每天在裂缝边谈心,一直到黄昏日落,一直到夜晚来临不得不分开的 时候,才互相紧贴着墙,佛互相热烈地拥抱,并投以无法触及对方嘴唇的深吻。

每一个清晨,就是微曦刚刚驱走了天上的星星,露珠还沾在园中的草尖,匹勒姆斯与西丝比就偷偷来到裂缝旁边,倚着那一道隔阻他们的厚墙,低声吐露难以抑压的爱意,并痛苦地为悲惨的命运痛哭。

有时候,他们互视着含泪的眼睛,一句话也说不出来。这样过了一段时间以后,他们终于决定逃离命运的安排,希望能逃到一个让他们自由相爱的地方。于是,他们相约当天晚上离家出走,偷偷出城,逃到城外树林墓地里一株长满雪白浆果的桑树下相会。

他们终于等到了夜晚,西丝比在夜色的掩护下逃出家里的庄园,她独自向郊外的树林走去。她虽然是从未在夜晚离家的千金小姐,但在黑里走着却一点也不害怕,那是由于爱情的力量;她渴望着和匹勒姆斯相会,使她完全忘记了恐惧。

很快的,西丝比就来到了墓地,站在长满雪白色浆果的桑树下,这一棵高大的桑树在夜色中是多么柔美,微风一吹,每一片树叶都佛是歌唱着一般。而月光里的桑椹果格外的洁白,如同天空中照耀的星星。西丝比看着桑果,温柔而充满信心地等待匹勒姆斯,因为就在那一天的清晨,他们曾在墙隙中相互起誓,不管多么困难,都要在桑树下相会,若不相见,至死不散。

正当西丝比沉醉在爱情的幻想里,她看到从很远的地方走来一只狮子,那只狮子显然刚刚狙杀了一只动物,下巴还挂着正在滴落的鲜血,它似乎要到不远处去饮泉水解渴。看到狮子,西丝比惊惶地逃走了,她来得太仓促,遗落了披在身上的斗篷。
喝完泉水的狮子要回去时过桑树,看到落在地上犹温的斗篷,把它撕成粉碎,才大摇大摆地走入深林。

狮子走了才几分钟,匹勒姆斯来到桑树下,正为见不到西丝比而着急,转头却看见落了满地的斗篷碎片,上面还沾了斑斑血迹,地上还留着狮子清晰的脚印。他忍不住痛哭起来,因为他意识到西丝比已被凶猛的野兽所噬。他转而痛恨自己,因为他没有先她抵达,才使她丧失了性命,他依在桑树干上流泪,并且责备自己:“是我杀了你!是我杀了你!”

他从地上拾起斗篷碎片,深情地吻着,他抬起头来望向满树的雪白浆果说:“你将染上我的鲜血。”于是,他拔出剑来刺向自己的心窝,鲜血向上喷射,顿时把所有的浆果都染成血一样鲜红的颜色。

匹勒姆斯缓缓地倒在地上,脸上还挂着悔恨的泪珠,死去了。

逃到了远处的西丝比,她固然害怕狮子,却更怕失去爱人,就大着胆子冒险回到桑树下,站在树下时,她非常奇怪那些如星星洁白闪耀的果子不见了,她惊疑地四下搜寻,发现地上有一堆黑影,定神一看,才知道是匹勒姆斯躺在血泊里,她扑上去搂抱他,亲吻他冰冷的嘴唇,声嘶力竭地说,“醒来呀!亲爱的!是我呀,你的西丝比,你最亲爱的西丝比。”已经死去的匹勒姆斯的眼睛突然张开,望了她一眼,眼中流泪、出血,又合了起来,这一次,死神完完全全把他带走了。
西丝比看见他手中滑落的剑,以及另一只手握着沾满血迹的斗篷碎片,心里就明白了发生过的事。

她流着泪说:“是你对我的挚爱杀了你,我也有为你而死的挚爱,在这个世界上,即使死神也没有力量把我们分开。”于是,她用那把还沾着爱人血迹的剑,刺进自己的心窝,鲜血喷射到已经被染红的桑椹,桑果更鲜红了,红得犹如要滴出血来。

从那个时候开始,全世界的桑椹全部变成红色,佛是在纪念匹勒姆斯与西丝比的爱情,也成为真心相爱的人永恒的标志。

这是一个多么动人的爱情故事,原典出自希腊神话,我做了一些改写。

匹勒姆斯与西丝比的故事,可以说是“希腊悲剧”的原型,后来西方的许多悲剧,例如罗蜜欧与茱丽叶、维特与夏绿蒂等待,都是从这个原型发展出来的。虽然有无数的文学家用想象力与优美的文采,丰富了许多爱情故事,但这原型的故事并未失去其动人的力量。

我在十八岁时第一次读“匹勒姆斯与西丝比”就深受感动,当时在乡下,我家的后院里就有两棵高大的桑树正结出红得像血一样的浆果,从窗子望出去,就浮现出匹勒姆斯和西丝比倒地的一幕,血,有如满天的雨,洒在桑椹上,格外给人一种苍凉的感觉。
我们当然知道,染血的桑椹无非是希腊古代文学家的幻想,可是桑椹也真的像血一样。桑椹可能是世界是最脆弱的水果,采的时候一定要小心翼翼,否则立即破皮流“血”。它几乎也很难带去市场出售,因为只要很短的时间,它的“血浆”就会自动流出。

桑椹是非常甜的水果,熟透的桑椹是接近紫色的,甜得像蜜一样。但我们通常难得等到它成为紫色,总是鲜红的时候就摘下来,洗净,拌一点糖,吃起来甜中微带着流动的酸味,那滋味应该像是匹勒姆斯和西丝比隔着围墙相望一般。

年幼的时候吃桑椹,并没有特别的印象,自从读了这一则神话,桑椹的生命就活了起来,红色的桑椹因此充满了爱与美、酸楚与苦痛的联想,那见证了爱之心灵不朽的桑椹,也给我们对永恒之爱的向往。

可叹的是,爱的真实里,悲剧的原型仍然是最普遍的。在这样的悲剧里,巴比伦城郊外的那一颗桑树,除了见证了爱的不朽,还见证了什么呢?

可以说它是看到了因缘的无常。所有的爱情悲剧都是因缘的变迁和错失所造成的。它也没有一定的面目。在围墙的缝隙中,爱的心灵也可以茁壮长大,至于是不是结果,就要看在广大的桑树下有没有相会的因缘了。

一对情侣能不能在一起,往往要经过长久的考验,那考验有如一头凶猛的犹带着血迹的狮子,它不一定能伤害到爱情的本质,却往往使爱情走了岔。

当我们看到西丝比到桑树下几分钟,狮子来了。狮子走了几分钟,匹勒姆斯来了。匹勒姆斯倒下几分钟,西丝比来了……这正是爱情因缘的“错谬性”,看到一步一步推进悲剧的深渊,即使是桑树也会为之泣血。

像匹勒姆斯与西丝比那样惨烈的经验可能是少见的,不过,一般人到了中年,如果回想自己遭遇的爱情悲剧,就有如发生在桑树下那神话一样的错谬,往往只要几分钟的时间,可能一个人的生命的历史就要重写。也许有人觉得不然,但一个人的被见离、被遗弃,往往是一念之间的事,比几分钟快得多,有一些悲剧的发生直是急如闪电的。

一位朋友向我描述一对恋人逃难的情况,男的最后一瞬间挤到火车顶上,正伸手要把女的拉上来,火车开了,两人牵着的手硬生生被拉开,男的没有勇气跳下去,女的也上不来,车上车下掩面痛哭。我的朋友当年看到这样的场面,忍不住落泪。

这要怪谁呢?怪男的也不是,怪女的也不是。怪火车吗?谁叫他们不早一分钟到呢?怪时代吗?在最混乱的时代也有人团圆,在最安静的时代也有人仳离呀!要怪,只能怪无常,怪因缘。其实,千辛万苦热恋结合的伴侣,终生幸福的,又有几人能够呢?

如此说来,匹勒姆斯与西丝比当下的殉情倒还是幸福的,因为他们证明了不在错谬下屈服,要为爱情抗争到底,连死神都不能使他们分开,他们死时至少是心甘情愿的,充满了爱的。人死了,爱情不死,总比爱情死了,人还活着更有动人的质地。

在这个动人的传奇里,最使我震撼的不是匹勒姆斯或西丝比,而是那一棵桑树,桑虽无情,却有永恒的怀抱,要让世人看见桑树时,知道人间有一些爱的心灵不死。

几天前,有人送我一盒桑椹,带着血色的,在夕阳下吃的时候,又使我想起在遥远的巴比伦城郊外,那一棵雪白浆果的桑树―――“你将染满我的鲜血”,空中有一个声音这样说。

从此,世界上的桑树浆果全从白色变成红色,成为真心相爱的人永恒的标志。
        

#10  Re: Happy 450th Birthday, Shakespeare! 仲夏夜之梦             Go Back
我那样的感慨,就是因为深感自己其实缺少那种“爱”。因为我这段时间,或者说这几年,都深陷“世俗烦恼”之中。

云天绝对是少有的真爱艺术的网友之一。


云天 wrote: (5/18/2014 0:25)
"普赛尔的这部名剧", 的确”动人“。 或许以后会单开一线。

西方文学里时常会提到希腊神话,借莎翁的剧,趁机贴一下。
站长是”真爱艺术“。像我这样不懂艺术的,也能“自得其乐”呢。

"The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls." -- by Pablo Picasso

--*--*--*--*--*--*--*--*--*--*--*
自得其乐
        

#11  Re: Happy 450th Birthday, Shakespeare! 仲夏夜之梦             Go Back
站长缺少对艺术的那种“爱”? are you kidding me?

站长所言“世俗烦恼”,大概是在爱阳线上提到的”每天从早到晚都在写程序,还是没有写出什么名堂“?
不管有无名堂,肯定数钞票数到手发软。

站长过奖。 如果说我有那么一点点爱艺术,那纯粹是为了舒缓忙碌的生活,也因为自知自己知识贫乏。
最能让我减轻压力的是运动. without exercise, i'd feel half dead.


Last modified on 05/20/14 01:39
        

#12  《仲夏夜之梦》第二幕 第一场             Go Back


love-in-idleness, 三色堇


ACT II

SCENE I. A wood near Athens.

第二幕

第一场。 雅典郊外的林子

Enter, from opposite sides, a Fairy, and PUCK
仙女和帕克相向而入。

PUCK
How now, spirit! whither wander you?

帕克
嗨,精灵!你到哪儿游荡?

Fairy
Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire,
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the fairy queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green.
The cowslips tall her pensioners be:
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours,
In those freckles live their savours:
I must go seek some dewdrops here
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.
Farewell, thou lob of spirits; I'll be gone:
Our queen and all our elves come here anon.

仙女
翻山岭,走溪谷,
穿过荆棘和灌木;
跨公园,越栅栏,
身经洪水与烈焰。
天涯海角任漂泊,
月轮不及我敏捷;
我为仙后勤忙碌,
绿草环上挂露珠。
仙后侍卫洋樱草,
黄金裳上斑点耀;
莹莹朱玉仙后赐,
缕缕芬芳驻其里。
我须寻来水晶露,
樱草耳畔缀珍珠。
再见再见笨精灵,
仙后即刻将驾临。

PUCK
The king doth keep his revels here to-night:
Take heed the queen come not within his sight;
For Oberon is passing fell and wrath,
Because that she as her attendant hath
A lovely boy, stolen from an Indian king;
She never had so sweet a changeling;
And jealous Oberon would have the child
Knight of his train, to trace the forests wild;
But she perforce withholds the loved boy,
Crowns him with flowers and makes him all her joy:
And now they never meet in grove or green,
By fountain clear, or spangled starlight sheen,
But, they do square, that all their elves for fear
Creep into acorn-cups and hide them there.

帕克
大王今晚要在此设宴,
可别让他和仙后撞见;
奥布朗眼下满腹火气,
因仙后从印度王那里,
偷到了一个漂亮男孩,
他生得如此甜美可爱;
大王眼红想据为己有,
让少年伴他林间漫游;
但仙后哪肯割爱相让,
给他戴花冠宠爱万般;
他俩如今在林间草甸,
泉畔星空下从不约见;
二人口角时,小精灵
就躲进橡壳战战兢兢。

Fairy
Either I mistake your shape and making quite,
Or else you are that shrewd and knavish sprite
Call'd Robin Goodfellow: are not you he
That frights the maidens of the villagery;
Skim milk, and sometimes labour in the quern
And bootless make the breathless housewife churn;
And sometime make the drink to bear no barm;
Mislead night-wanderers, laughing at their harm?
Those that Hobgoblin call you and sweet Puck,
You do their work, and they shall have good luck:
Are not you he?

仙女
假如我没认错人,脑袋够清醒,
那你就是那个狡黠鬼怪的精灵,
名叫罗宾。好人。你是不是他?
你吓得村里的姑娘们担惊受怕;
你爱揩点奶油,有时帮人磨面,
还让主妇搅不出奶油气喘连连;
有时弄得酒浆不起泡沫不发酵,
让走夜路的人迷向,你却窃笑?
谁要是唤你为甜帕可或鬼精灵,
你就给他帮工给他带来好运命。
你就是他,对吧?

PUCK
Thou speak'st aright;
I am that merry wanderer of the night.
I jest to Oberon and make him smile
When I a fat and bean-fed horse beguile,
Neighing in likeness of a filly foal:
And sometime lurk I in a gossip's bowl,
In very likeness of a roasted crab,
And when she drinks, against her lips I bob
And on her wither'd dewlap pour the ale.
The wisest aunt, telling the saddest tale,
Sometime for three-foot stool mistaketh me;
Then slip I from her bum, down topples she,
And 'tailor' cries, and falls into a cough;
And then the whole quire hold their hips and laugh,
And waxen in their mirth and neeze and swear
A merrier hour was never wasted there.
But, room, fairy! here comes Oberon.

帕克
你说的没错,
我就是那个快乐的夜游者。
我跟奥布朗说笑话,逗他笑,
比方我会学小牝马叫,
让一只豆子喂肥的马儿上当受骗;
有时我扮成一只烘熟的酸苹果,躲进长舌妇的酒碗,
她张口喝时,我就跳上她干瘪的嘴唇,麦芽酒洒一地。
有个最精明的妇人,擅长讲悲惨故事,
有次错把我当成三只脚的小板凳,
我从她臀下突然溜掉,她扑通一声,
摔个倒栽葱,大叫道,”哎呦, 妈呀“,
她接着咳个不停,众人捧着肚子笑得涕泪俱下,
发誓说从没这么开心热闹。
但是,仙子,借道!奥布朗大王驾到。

Fairy
And here my mistress. Would that he were gone!

仙女
啊,仙后也来了。但愿大王不在!

Enter, from one side, OBERON, with his train; from the other, TITANIA, with hers

奥布朗和侍从从一侧走入;泰坦尼娅与随从自另一侧进入

OBERON
Ill met by moonlight, proud Titania.

奥布朗
骄傲的泰坦尼娅,在月光下撞到你,真不赶巧。

TITANIA
What, jealous Oberon! Fairies, skip hence:
I have forsworn his bed and company.

泰坦尼娅
哼,嫉妒的奥布朗!
仙女们,我们到别处去;我已发誓不和他同寝共游。

OBERON
Tarry, rash wanton: am not I thy lord?

奥布朗
慢着,大胆妇人,脾气竟如此火爆。我难道不是你该顺从的夫君吗?

TITANIA
Then I must be thy lady: but I know
When thou hast stolen away from fairy land,
And in the shape of Corin sat all day,
Playing on pipes of corn and versing love
To amorous Phillida. Why art thou here,
Come from the farthest Steppe of India?
But that, forsooth, the bouncing Amazon,
Your buskin'd mistress and your warrior love,
To Theseus must be wedded, and you come
To give their bed joy and prosperity.

泰坦尼娅
那我就是你尊贵的王后,
但我知道,你曾偷偷溜出仙境,
装扮成牧人模样,镇日坐在那儿,
吹着玉米芯做的风笛,向你的情人哼唱爱情小调。
你为什么从印度草原千里迢迢赶到这儿?
但这当然是因为这高大强壮的女人,
你足蹬靴子的情妇,你英勇擅战的爱人,
就要嫁给忒修斯了,所以你特地来给他们道喜。

(Note: Corin and Phillida are traditional names in pastoral poetry — Corin, for a lovesick shepherd, who attaches as much importance to his musical abilities and his love as to his flocks.)

OBERON
How canst thou thus for shame, Titania,
Glance at my credit with Hippolyta,
Knowing I know thy love to Theseus?
Didst thou not lead him through the glimmering night
From Perigenia, whom he ravished?
And make him with fair AEgle break his faith,
With Ariadne and Antiopa?

奥布朗
泰坦尼娅, 你明知我晓得你同忒修斯的私情,
还把我和希波吕忒扯到一起,也不害臊。
在他强奸佩丽吉娜之后,带他遁入夜色的,不是你吗?
让他抛弃美丽的艾伊格乐、阿丽娅德妮和安提欧帕的,不也是你吗?

TITANIA
These are the forgeries of jealousy:
And never, since the middle summer's spring,
Met we on hill, in dale, forest or mead,
By paved fountain or by rushy brook,
Or in the beached margent of the sea,
To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind,
But with thy brawls thou hast disturb'd our sport.
Therefore the winds, piping to us in vain,
As in revenge, have suck'd up from the sea
Contagious fogs; which falling in the land
Have every pelting river made so proud
That they have overborne their continents:
The ox hath therefore stretch'd his yoke in vain,
The ploughman lost his sweat, and the green corn
Hath rotted ere his youth attain'd a beard;
The fold stands empty in the drowned field,
And crows are fatted with the murrion flock;
The nine men's morris is fill'd up with mud,
And the quaint mazes in the wanton green
For lack of tread are undistinguishable:
The human mortals want their winter here;
No night is now with hymn or carol blest:
Therefore the moon, the governess of floods,
Pale in her anger, washes all the air,
That rheumatic diseases do abound:
And thorough this distemperature we see
The seasons alter: hoary-headed frosts
Far in the fresh lap of the crimson rose,
And on old Hiems' thin and icy crown
An odorous chaplet of sweet summer buds
Is, as in mockery, set: the spring, the summer,
The childing autumn, angry winter, change
Their wonted liveries, and the mazed world,
By their increase, now knows not which is which:
And this same progeny of evils comes
From our debate, from our dissension;
We are their parents and original.

泰坦尼娅
全是嫉妒生出的谎言。
自仲夏伊始,在山中,在溪谷,在林间,在草甸,
在石砌的喷泉边,在汩汩的溪流旁,在海边沙滩,
每当我们围在一起要踏着簌簌风声起舞时,
你就吵嚷取闹,搅坏我们的兴致。
这样一来,风白费力气给我们吹笛奏曲,遂气得实施报复。
风从海里吸聚有害雾霭,然后降落成雨,
每一条河流都神气十足,洪水肆意泛滥。
套轭的耕牛枉费力气,
犁地的农夫汗水白淌,
青玉米还没结穗就烂掉了;
水汪汪的田野上羊圈空空,
啄食瘟羊的乌鸦肚腹鼓胀;
游戏比赛的场地淤泥满地,
绿甸上杂草疯长,因无人行走,
离奇的迷宫小径已不复辨认。
凡夫俗子都盼着冬天快快到来,
如今夜晚既没有赞美诗,也没有欢乐的颂歌,
掌控潮汐的月亮因而大发雷霆,脸色煞白,
将空气冲洗得透湿,风湿症流行肆虐。
气温时冷时热,我们置身的季节因而变幻无常:
白头寒霜拜倒在红玫瑰娇柔的怀抱里,
老迈冬神头顶着薄冰王冠,上面却搞笑地嵌满芬芳的夏日蓓蕾。
春天和夏天,果实累累的秋,怒气冲冲的冬,
都改变了往常的装束,
世界对此错愕不已,如今已无法分辨季节。
我们两人的争吵纠纷,酿成了这些恶果,
我们是罪之母,恶之源。

OBERON
Do you amend it then; it lies in you:
Why should Titania cross her Oberon?
I do but beg a little changeling boy,
To be my henchman.

奥布朗
亡羊补牢,犹未迟也;搞定这件事,全在你一念之间。
泰坦尼娅何苦要跟她的奥布朗过不去呢?
我不过是求你把一个小男孩送给我做跟班。

TITANIA
Set your heart at rest:
The fairy land buys not the child of me.
His mother was a votaress of my order:
And, in the spiced Indian air, by night,
Full often hath she gossip'd by my side,
And sat with me on Neptune's yellow sands,
Marking the embarked traders on the flood,
When we have laugh'd to see the sails conceive
And grow big-bellied with the wanton wind;
Which she, with pretty and with swimming gait
Following,--her womb then rich with my young squire,--
Would imitate, and sail upon the land,
To fetch me trifles, and return again,
As from a voyage, rich with merchandise.
But she, being mortal, of that boy did die;
And for her sake do I rear up her boy,
And for her sake I will not part with him.


泰坦尼娅
你就死了这条心吧,
就是拿整个仙境换这孩子,我也不干。
他母亲曾是崇拜我的信徒。
夜晚,印度的空气弥漫着香料的芬芳,
她常常在我身旁讲闲话。
我们坐在海边金色的沙滩上,
望着水中的商船。
那时我们笑着,看放荡的风
让船帆怀孕,鼓起肚皮。
而她当时肚里正怀着这个小男孩,
遂模仿帆船,以漂亮的泳姿在地上滑行,
去为我取些小玩意,又返回,
好像航行归来,满载物品。
但她是凡人,生下这孩子后死了。
为了她的缘故,我养育她的孩子,
也为她的缘故,我绝不和他分离。

OBERON
How long within this wood intend you stay?

奥布朗
你打算在这片林子里呆多久?

TITANIA
Perchance till after Theseus' wedding-day.
If you will patiently dance in our round
And see our moonlight revels, go with us;
If not, shun me, and I will spare your haunts.

泰坦尼娅
也许呆到忒修斯举行婚礼之后。
如果你愿意耐心地跟我们一起跳舞,
看我们在月下狂欢,那就跟我们来;
不然,井水不犯河水,我们互不打扰。

OBERON
Give me that boy, and I will go with thee.

奥布朗
把那个小男孩送我,我就跟你走。

TITANIA
Not for thy fairy kingdom. Fairies, away!
We shall chide downright, if I longer stay.

泰坦尼娅
拿整个仙境交换也休想。仙女们,我们走!
我若多呆片刻,我俩定会吵得天昏地暗。

Exit TITANIA with her train 众仙随泰坦尼娅下。

OBERON
Well, go thy way: thou shalt not from this grove
Till I torment thee for this injury.
My gentle Puck, come hither. Thou rememberest
Since once I sat upon a promontory,
And heard a mermaid on a dolphin's back
Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath
That the rude sea grew civil at her song
And certain stars shot madly from their spheres,
To hear the sea-maid's music.

奥布朗
那好,走你的独木桥去吧。
你这么羞辱我,我非得让你好看,不然你别想迈出这片林子。
我谦恭的帕克,过来。你还记得吗,
我有次坐在海边悬崖上,
听到美人鱼唱歌,她骑在海豚背上。
那歌声是如此美妙和谐,
让狂野的大海变得彬彬有礼,
有些星星也不顾一切冲出轨道,
只为聆听美人鱼的歌声。

PUCK
I remember.

帕克
我记得。

OBERON
That very time I saw, but thou couldst not,
Flying between the cold moon and the earth,
Cupid all arm'd: a certain aim he took
At a fair vestal throned by the west,
And loosed his love-shaft smartly from his bow,
As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts;
But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft
Quench'd in the chaste beams of the watery moon,
And the imperial votaress passed on,
In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Yet mark'd I where the bolt of Cupid fell:
It fell upon a little western flower,
Before milk-white, now purple with love's wound,
And maidens call it love-in-idleness.
Fetch me that flower; the herb I shew'd thee once:
The juice of it on sleeping eye-lids laid
Will make or man or woman madly dote
Upon the next live creature that it sees.
Fetch me this herb; and be thou here again
Ere the leviathan can swim a league.

奥布朗
就在那个夜晚,我目睹(你却看不见)丘比特身背弓箭,
从寒冷的月亮飞向地球。他瞄准端坐西方宝座上的一位美丽贞女,
从弦上射出一支强劲的爱之箭,足能穿透十万颗心。
但我看见,少年丘比特的利箭
熄灭于如水的贞洁月光里,
而未受干扰的女王,
依旧沉思冥想,天真无邪。
我特别留意了丘比特爱箭所落之处。
它坠落在西方一株小小的花朵上,
先前乳白色的花,因情伤,如今成了紫色,
少女们称之为"三色堇“。
去把花给我採来;我以前让你瞧过。
熟睡人的眼皮上滴了这花液,
无论男女,都会疯狂地爱上醒来后第一眼看见的生物。
快去把花採来,务必在大海怪还没游到三海里时,回到此地。


PUCK
I'll put a girdle round about the earth
In forty minutes.

帕克
只消四十分钟我就能绕地球转一圈。

Exit 帕克下

OBERON
Having once this juice,
I'll watch Titania when she is asleep,
And drop the liquor of it in her eyes.
The next thing then she waking looks upon,
Be it on lion, bear, or wolf, or bull,
On meddling monkey, or on busy ape,
She shall pursue it with the soul of love:
And ere I take this charm from off her sight,
As I can take it with another herb,
I'll make her render up her page to me.
But who comes here? I am invisible;
And I will overhear their conference.

奥布朗
花液一到手,我就要盯紧泰坦尼娅,
待她进入梦乡,便滴几滴到她眼皮上。
她醒来第一眼看到的,
无论是狮子,熊,狼,公牛呀,
还是好事的猴子,忙碌的猿猴,
她都会满腔爱恋地狂追不舍。
我会用另外一种药草解除她眼里的魔力,
但我得先让她把那侍童送给我。
咦,谁到这儿来了? 我是隐形的,
我得听听他们说些什么。

Enter DEMETRIUS, HELENA, following him

狄米特律斯上,海丽娜紧随其后

DEMETRIUS
I love thee not, therefore pursue me not.
Where is Lysander and fair Hermia?
The one I'll slay, the other slayeth me.
Thou told'st me they were stolen unto this wood;
And here am I, and wood within this wood,
Because I cannot meet my Hermia.
Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more.

狄米特律斯
我不爱你,所以你别老跟着我。
拉山德和美丽的荷米亚在哪儿呢?
一个是我要杀的,另一个却能要我的命。
你跟我说,他们逃到这片林子里了;
我来了,我的荷米亚却连个影儿也不见,
我在林子里真是急得抓狂。
你给我走开,别再跟着我。

(wood adj. Archaic: Mentally unbalanced; insane.)

HELENA
You draw me, you hard-hearted adamant;
But yet you draw not iron, for my heart
Is true as steel: leave you your power to draw,
And I shall have no power to follow you.

海丽娜
是你在吸引我,你这无情的磁石;
可你却不吸引铁,因为我的心忠贞如钢。
你一旦丢掉你的吸引力,
我也就失去跟着你的力量了。

DEMETRIUS
Do I entice you? do I speak you fair?
Or, rather, do I not in plainest truth
Tell you, I do not, nor I cannot love you?

狄米特律斯
我引诱你了么?我好声好气对你说话了么?
我难道没有清清楚楚地向你明说
我既不爱你,也不能爱你吗?

(fair:kindly, encouragingly, courteously)

HELENA
And even for that do I love you the more.
I am your spaniel; and, Demetrius,
The more you beat me, I will fawn on you:
Use me but as your spaniel, spurn me, strike me,
Neglect me, lose me; only give me leave,
Unworthy as I am, to follow you.
What worser place can I beg in your love,--
And yet a place of high respect with me,--
Than to be used as you use your dog?

荷米亚
那只让我更爱你。
我就是你的猎犬;狄米特律斯,
你越打我,我越要巴结你。
就把我当成你的猎犬吧,踢我,打我也好,
对我不理不睬,想甩掉我也罢,
只要允许我跟着你就行,虽然我不配。
在你的爱情里,我还能乞求比狗更加卑贱的地位吗?
但这已让我倍感荣耀了。

DEMETRIUS
Tempt not too much the hatred of my spirit;
For I am sick when I do look on thee.

狄米特律斯
别惹我太恨你。
一看到你,我就讨厌。

HELENA
And I am sick when I look not on you.

海丽娜
看不见你,我就病恹恹的。

DEMETRIUS
You do impeach your modesty too much,
To leave the city and commit yourself
Into the hands of one that loves you not;
To trust the opportunity of night
And the ill counsel of a desert place
With the rich worth of your virginity.

狄米特律斯
你从城里跑出来,把自己托付给
一个根本不爱你的人;
你妄信黑夜是天赐良机,
你拿宝贵的贞洁冒险,妄信这心怀叵测的荒寂之地
你这么做简直太不把自己的名声当回事了。

HELENA
Your virtue is my privilege: for that
It is not night when I do see your face,
Therefore I think I am not in the night;
Nor doth this wood lack worlds of company,
For you in my respect are all the world:
Then how can it be said I am alone,
When all the world is here to look on me?

海丽娜
我仰仗你的美德保护我。
有你在我眼前,就不再是黑夜。
所以,我不觉得自己身处暗夜,
这片林子也不乏伴侣,
因为, 于我, 你即为整个世界。
当整个世界在这里注视着我,
又怎能说我是独身一人呢?

DEMETRIUS
I'll run from thee and hide me in the brakes,
And leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts.

狄米特律斯
我要离开你,躲进树丛里,
让你一人听任野兽摆布。

HELENA
The wildest hath not such a heart as you.
Run when you will, the story shall be changed:
Apollo flies, and Daphne holds the chase;
The dove pursues the griffin; the mild hind
Makes speed to catch the tiger; bootless speed,
When cowardice pursues and valour flies.

海丽娜
最凶残的动物也没你这么狠心。
你啥时想跑就跑好了,神话故事也该改写了:
阿波罗飞跑,达芙妮猛追;
鸽子追狮鹫;温顺的雌鹿追猎老虎;
弱者追赶飞奔的勇者时,速度根本无济于事。


DEMETRIUS
I will not stay thy questions; let me go:
Or, if thou follow me, do not believe
But I shall do thee mischief in the wood.

狄米特律斯
我可不会耗在这儿听你啰嗦,让我走吧。
你若继续跟着我,别以为
我不会在林子里教训你。


HELENA
Ay, in the temple, in the town, the field,
You do me mischief. Fie, Demetrius!
Your wrongs do set a scandal on my sex:
We cannot fight for love, as men may do;
We should be wood and were not made to woo.

Exit DEMETRIUS

I'll follow thee and make a heaven of hell,
To die upon the hand I love so well.

Exit

海丽娜
唉,不管是在庙里,还是在镇上或野外,
走到哪儿你都羞辱我。呸, 狄米特律斯!
你的过错侵犯了我们所有女性。
身为女人,我们不能像男人那样为爱宣战,
因为我们生来就是被人追被人爱的,而不是追着别人求爱。
(狄米特律斯下)
我要紧追不舍,若死在我挚爱的人手里,
地狱也就变天堂了。

海丽娜下

OBERON
Fare thee well, nymph: ere he do leave this grove,
Thou shalt fly him and he shall seek thy love.
Re-enter PUCK
Hast thou the flower there? Welcome, wanderer.

奥布朗
再见,美丽的姑娘。在他迈出这片小树林前,
你看见他将逃之夭夭,而他将会紧追不舍向你求爱。
(帕克复入)
你在那儿採到花了吗?欢迎归来,漫游者。

PUCK
Ay, there it is.

帕克
哦,花在这儿。

OBERON
I pray thee, give it me.
I know a bank where the wild thyme blows,
Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows,
Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine,
With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine:
There sleeps Titania sometime of the night,
Lull'd in these flowers with dances and delight;
And there the snake throws her enamell'd skin,
Weed wide enough to wrap a fairy in:
And with the juice of this I'll streak her eyes,
And make her full of hateful fantasies.
Take thou some of it, and seek through this grove:
A sweet Athenian lady is in love
With a disdainful youth: anoint his eyes;
But do it when the next thing he espies
May be the lady: thou shalt know the man
By the Athenian garments he hath on.
Effect it with some care, that he may prove
More fond on her than she upon her love:
And look thou meet me ere the first cock crow.

奥布朗
请把花给我。
我知道百里香盛开的河岸,
那有樱草和摇曳的紫罗兰;
金银花麝香玫瑰和野蔷薇,
撑起茂盛的花蓬吐露芳菲;
泰坦尼娅有时候夜眠花丛,
花儿们柔姿轻舞伴她入梦;
花蛇甩掉她斑斓多彩的皮,
足够让小仙女裹上当外衣;
我要把花液滴到仙后眼上,
让她充满可憎可恶的幻想。
你带上些花液在林中找寻,
有个雅典美女痴恋薄情人,
你给他的眼上滴几滴花液,
但要保证他醒来的那一刻,
看见那姑娘;你不会认错,
因他从头到脚雅典人装束。
你须谨慎;要让这负心郎
对这姑娘的爱更深更痴狂。
第一声鸡鸣前来向我复命。

PUCK
Fear not, my lord, your servant shall do so.

帕克
大王,您放心,仆人我一定遵命。

Exeunt 下


云天译
        

#13  《仲夏夜之梦》中的典故--- 《阿波罗与达芙妮》的故事             Go Back

Apollo and Daphne is a life-sized Baroque marble sculpture by Italian artist Gian Lorenzo Bernini, executed between 1622 and 1625. Housed in the Galleria Borghese in Rome, the work depicts the climax of the story of Daphne and Phoebus in Ovid'sMetamorphoses.


在第二幕第一场中,海利娜说了与希腊神话故事相反的情形:
Run when you will, the story shall be changed:
Apollo flies, and Daphne holds the chase;

阿波罗与达芙妮的故事起源于奥维德的《变形记》,美国作家 Thomas Bulfinch's The Age of Fable, or Stories of Gods and Heroes 的版本也很精彩。“桂冠”之说即源于这个故事。

罗马城The Borghese Gallery 里贝尼尼的这座雕像是每个向往罗马的人不可错过的艺术杰作,只在油管看看已是精美绝伦了,若在真迹前观赏定会流连忘返。 贝尼尼无疑是千年一现的天才。贝尼尼曾把亲弟兄的肋骨打断,罗马教皇却因欣赏他的盖世才华而为他开脱。贝尼尼的杰作很多,贴段clip:

The Power of Art - Bernini (complete episode)




罗马诗人奥维德的《变形记》中《阿波罗与达芙妮》的故事:

zt:

宙斯有一个儿子和一个女儿
儿子叫"阿波罗"
他是一个俊美的男生,他力大无比
是专门掌管太阳的"太阳神"
女儿则是掌管月亮的"月亮女神"
有一天
阿波罗接到父亲的指示去射杀一个妖怪~
在回来的路上看到一个小孩在玩弄一张弓
他就走到孩子的面前说:"你们小孩不可以玩弓"并提起射杀得的妖怪给他看~`~~好说了很多轻蔑的话~
那个小孩就是就是掌管爱的丘比特
丘比特因啊波罗的话十分生气
就说:"你信不信我回会用我的箭射中你."
阿波罗当然不相信
于是丘比特对着天空射出了两支特别的箭
第一支箭会使人深深陷入爱河
第二只箭则使人不会对异性动心~~~~~
第一支箭射中了阿波罗
第二只箭射中了河神的女儿,一个名叫达芙妮的美丽少女他是神界中第一大美女
阿波罗一看到达芙妮就深深爱上了她
他对她的爱就像疾病一样无法控制。
他如影随形地跟着达妮芙
不过那名少女崇尚月亮女神,想追随她成为一个永恒的处女,因此对男
性非常排斥,根本不理会阿波罗的追求。
可啊波罗并没有放弃
一天啊波罗在树林里见到了达芙妮
就走过去想向他表白

可是因为丘比特的箭的作用
她不停的逃开他~达芙妮越跑越惊慌,因为这一次阿波罗是铁了心肠不让她离开,就在他快要追到的时候,终于她停住了,因为他被一条大河拦住了
达芙妮向他前面的大河喊救:"爸爸你请你张开大口把我吞下去吧."
河神向来疼爱这个美丽的女儿,因此施展河神将她变成一株月桂树 .阿波罗看到了变成月桂树的达芙妮,感到懊悔万分,他轻拥着月桂树向她道歉,并且言明虽然她无法成为自己的妻子,但他对她的爱慕永远不变,他要用她的木材做他的竖琴,用她的花朵装饰他的弓箭,让她永远青春永驻,不必担心衰老。 后来取下月桂枝编织成桂冠,赐给一切有成就的人,这就是“桂冠”的由来。


Last modified on 05/25/14 16:26
        

#14  《仲夏夜之梦》第二幕 第二场             Go Back
ACT II
SCENE II. Another part of the wood.

第二幕
第二场。 林子另一处

Enter TITANIA, with her train of fairies

泰坦尼娅及众仙子上

TITANIA
Come, now a roundel and a fairy song;
Then, for the third part of a minute, hence;
Some to kill cankers in the musk-rose buds,
Some war with rere-mice for their leathern wings,
To make my small elves coats, and some keep back
The clamorous owl that nightly hoots and wonders
At our quaint spirits. Sing me now asleep;
Then to your offices and let me rest.

泰坦尼娅
来吧,跳一轮圆舞,唱一曲仙歌;
接下来,在剩下的三分之一分钟里,
一些仙子去杀麝香玫瑰花苞里的虫害,
一些去和蝙蝠作战,拿它们的皮翅膀
给我的小精灵们做外套,
还有一些驱走那些在夜间吵闹不休,看到
我们纤巧的小精灵就大惊小怪的猫头鹰。
现在,你们唱支歌给我催眠吧,
之后你们各司其职,让我好好歇息。

The Fairies sing 仙子们歌唱

FIRST FAIRY
(sings)
 You spotted snakes with double tongue,
 Thorny hedgehogs, be not seen.
 Newts and blindworms, do no wrong.
 Come not near our fairy queen.

第一个仙子唱:
双舌花斑蛇,还有小刺猬,
不许到这里,仙后将入睡;
蝾螈和蜥蜴,千万别捣乱,
仙后歇息地,莫要靠近前。

FAIRIES
(sing)
 Philomel, with melody
 Sing in our sweet lullaby.
 Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby.
 Never harm
 Nor spell nor charm
 Come our lovely lady nigh.
 So good night, with lullaby.

仙子们唱:
夜莺啊,请以美妙的旋律
为我们唱首甜美的摇篮曲;
睡吧,睡吧,睡吧,快快入梦啊。
愿永无伤害,
愿咒语和魔法不存在;
请飞到我们美丽的仙后身边,
唱首摇篮曲祝她晚安。

FIRST FAIRY
(sings)
 Weaving spiders, come not here.
 Hence, you long-legged spinners, hence!
Beetles black, approach not near.
 Worm nor snail, do no offense.

第一个仙子唱:
织网蜘蛛,别过来。
长脚蜘蛛,快走开!
黒壳甲虫,离远点,
蚯蚓蜗牛,莫冲犯。

FAIRIES
(sing)
 Philomel, with melody
 Sing in our sweet lullaby.
 Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby.
 Never harm
 Nor spell nor charm
 Come our lovely lady nigh.
 So good night, with lullaby.

仙子们唱:
夜莺啊,请以美妙的旋律
为我们唱首甜美的摇篮曲;
睡吧,睡吧,睡吧,快快入梦啊。
愿永无伤害,
愿咒语和魔法不存在;
请飞到我们美丽的仙后身边,
唱首摇篮曲祝她晚安。


TITANIA sleeps 泰坦尼娅入睡

SECOND FAIRY
Hence, away! Now all is well.
One aloof stand sentinel.

第二个仙子
好了,我们走吧!现在一切就绪。
留下一人警卫。

Exeunt FAIRIES 仙子们下

Enter OBERON 奥布朗上

OBERON
(squeezing flower juice on TITANIA ’s eyelids)
What thou seest when thou dost wake,
Do it for thy true love take.
Love and languish for his sake.
Be it ounce or cat or bear,
Pard or boar with bristled hair,
In thy eye that shall appear,
When thou wakest, it is thy dear.
Wake when some vile thing is near.

奥布朗
(挤几滴花液到泰坦尼娅眼皮上)
待你醒来第一眼,
见谁爱谁痴痴恋,
情浓意苦心甘愿。
管它山猫与熊虎,
还是豹子硬毛猪,
只要是你眼中物。
睁眼见啥你都爱,
丑怪在旁才醒来。

Exit OBERON 奥布朗下

Enter LYSANDER and HERMIA 拉山德同荷米亚上

LYSANDER
Fair love, you faint with wandering in the wood.
And to speak troth, I have forgot our way.
We’ll rest us, Hermia, if you think it good.
And tarry for the comfort of the day.

拉山德
美丽的爱人,在林中奔波令你晕眩,
告诉你实话,我忘记了我们的路线。
荷米亚,我们歇会儿,如果你愿意,
等到天亮我们再赶路,会比较容易。


HERMIA
Be it so, Lysander. Find you out a bed,
For I upon this bank will rest my head.

荷米娅
拉山德,就听你的。
你自己找个地方栖身,
我就在这小坡上安枕。

LYSANDER
One turf shall serve as pillow for us both.
One heart, one bed, two bosoms, and one troth.

拉山德
我俩当共枕一块草甸,
两胸一心共床共誓言。

HERMIA
Nay, good Lysander. For my sake, my dear,
Lie further off yet. Do not lie so near.

荷米娅
不可以,我的好拉山德。
亲爱的,为了我的原因,
请稍远些,别靠我太近。


LYSANDER
O, take the sense, sweet, of my innocence.
Love takes the meaning in love’s conference.
I mean that my heart unto yours is knit
So that but one heart we can make of it.
Two bosoms interchainèd with an oath—
So then two bosoms and a single troth.
Then by your side no bed room me deny.
For, lying so, Hermia, I do not lie.

拉山德
哦甜心,请相信我没有邪意,
恋人之间的交流当心有灵犀。
我是说我们俩的心连在一起,
就好像我们的心已合二为一。
一个盟誓将两个胸膛紧相连,
因此我说两个胸膛一个誓言。
所以莫要拒绝我躺在你身边,
荷米娅,请相信我绝无谎言。

HERMIA
Lysander riddles very prettily.
Now much beshrew my manners and my pride
If Hermia meant to say Lysander lied.
But, gentle friend, for love and courtesy
Lie further off in human modesty.
Such separation as may well be said
Becomes a virtuous bachelor and a maid.
So far be distant. And, good night, sweet friend.
Thy love ne'er alter till thy sweet life end!

荷米亚
拉山德你真是能言善道。
假如我曾暗示过你撒谎,
这般无礼令我羞愧难当。
但雅友,为爱情为礼节,
依行为规范,请离远些。
对品行端正的未婚男女,
睡眠时当保持一定间距。
离开点。亲爱的,晚安。
愿你的爱今生永不凋残!

LYSANDER
Amen, amen to that fair prayer, say I.
And then end life when I end loyalty!
Here is my bed. Sleep give thee all his rest!

拉山德
我说声阿门,赞同你的美丽祷告。
我不忠之时,我的生命即刻终止!
我睡这边。愿睡眠让你彻底放松!

HERMIA
With half that wish the wisher’s eyes be pressed!

荷米娅
这愿望与你对分,愿你也快快入梦乡!

HERMIA and LYSANDER sleep
荷米娅和拉山德入睡

Enter PUCK. 帕克上

PUCK
Through the forest have I gone.
But Athenian found I none,
On whose eyes I might approve
This flower's force in stirring love.
Night and silence.--Who is here?
Weeds of Athens he doth wear:
This is he, my master said,
Despised the Athenian maid;
And here the maiden, sleeping sound,
On the dank and dirty ground.
Pretty soul! she durst not lie
Near this lack-love, this kill-courtesy.
Churl, upon thy eyes I throw
All the power this charm doth owe.
When thou wakest, let love forbid
Sleep his seat on thy eyelid:
So awake when I am gone;
For I must now to Oberon.



帕克
我奔走于整座森林之间,
但一个雅典人也没瞧见。
要把花液滴在他眼皮上,
显现它激荡爱情的力量。
寂静的夜。谁躺在这里?
他浑身上下雅典人服饰。
正是我主人说的负心郎,
他瞧不上那位雅典姑娘。
这位姑娘正酣睡于梦乡,
她躺在潮湿脏脏的地上。
美丽的人!她不敢靠近
这个不爱她的粗俗男人。
乡巴佬,这花液很神奇,
我在你眼皮上滴满魔力。
当你醒来,受爱情支配,
你再不能合眼呼呼入睡。
待我离开后你就会梦醒,
我现在去见奥布朗复命。

Exit 帕克下

Enter DEMETRIUS and HELENA, running. 狄米特律斯和海丽娜跑上。


HELENA
Stay, though thou kill me, sweet Demetrius.

海丽娜
我的好狄米特律斯,请你停下来,就算你杀了我也成。

DEMETRIUS
I charge thee, hence, and do not haunt me thus.

狄米特律斯
你听着,那就别没完没了地跟着我。

HELENA
O, wilt thou darkling leave me? do not so.

海丽娜
你要把我丢在这黑漆漆的林子里? 求你别这样。

DEMETRIUS
Stay, on thy peril: I alone will go.

狄米特律斯
你呆在这儿后果自负。我一个人接着走。

Exit 狄米特律斯下

HELENA
O, I am out of breath in this fond chase!
The more my prayer, the lesser is my grace.
Happy is Hermia, wheresoe'er she lies;
For she hath blessed and attractive eyes.
How came her eyes so bright? Not with salt tears:
If so, my eyes are oftener wash'd than hers.
No, no, I am as ugly as a bear;
For beasts that meet me run away for fear:
Therefore no marvel though Demetrius
Do, as a monster fly my presence thus.
What wicked and dissembling glass of mine
Made me compare with Hermia's sphery eyne?
But who is here? Lysander! on the ground! 100
Dead? or asleep? I see no blood, no wound.
Lysander if you live, good sir, awake.

海丽娜
唉,这愚蠢的追赶害得我气喘!
我越是苦苦求他,越被他厌烦。
可荷米娅走到哪儿都好运当头,
只因为上帝赐她一双迷人眼眸。
她为何明眸灿灿?非泪水之故,
若是,我比她更常常以泪濯目。
不,不,我像熊一样无比丑陋,
就连野兽瞧见我都害怕得逃走。
难怪狄米特律斯一见我就离去,
就好像我是一个丑怪不堪入目。
是我哪一面邪恶又虚假的镜子,
让我和荷米娅的星子明眸相比?
呀这是谁?拉山德!躺在地上!
死了?还是睡着了?无血无伤。
好拉山德,你若活着就请醒来。

LYSANDER Awaking.
And run through fire I will for thy sweet sake.
Transparent Helena! Nature shows art,
That through thy bosom makes me see thy heart.
Where is Demetrius? O, how fit a word
Is that vile name to perish on my sword!

拉山德 (醒来)
甜心,我愿为你上刀山下火海。
晶莹海丽娜!大自然造化神奇,
让我透过你的胸看到你的心里。
狄米特律斯在哪?那无耻之名
合当在我的利剑之下遁失无影!

HELENA
Do not say so, Lysander. Say not so.
What though he love your Hermia? Lord, what though?
Yet Hermia still loves you. Then be content.

荷米娅
别这么说,拉山德。可别这么说。
就算他爱你的荷米娅,上帝,那又怎样呢?
可荷米娅仍然爱着你。你就心满意足吧。

LYSANDER
Content with Hermia? No. I do repent
The tedious minutes I with her have spent.
Not Hermia but Helena I love.
Who will not change a raven for a dove?
The will of man is by his reason swayed,
And reason says you are the worthier maid.
Things growing are not ripe until their season
So I, being young, till now ripe not to reason;
And touching now the point of human skill,
Reason becomes the marshal to my will
And leads me to your eyes, where I o'erlook
Love's stories written in love's richest book.

拉山德
对荷米娅满意?不。我们一起耗掉
那么些无聊时光,我后悔得不得了。
我才不爱荷米娅,我爱的是海丽娜。
拿一只乌鸦换一只白鸽,谁不想呀?
男人的意愿终归由他的理智所决定,
理智告诉我你更值得拥有我的爱情。
地里长的东西不到季节就不会成熟,
从前的我因为不成熟因而理性不足。
现在理性终于抵达智慧的耀眼光芒,
开始完全控制我的意愿和所思所想。
理性将我引到你的眼前,让我欣赏
写于最丰盛的爱之书上的爱情篇章。

HELENA
Wherefore was I to this keen mockery born?
When at your hands did I deserve this scorn?
Is ’t not enough, is ’t not enough, young man,
That I did never, no, nor never can,
Deserve a sweet look from Demetrius' eye,
But you must flout my insufficiency?
Good troth, you do me wrong, good sooth, you do,
In such disdainful manner me to woo.
But fare you well. Perforce I must confess
I thought you lord of more true gentleness.
Oh, that a lady of one man refused
Should of another therefore be abused!

荷米娅
为什么我总是被人无情嘲弄?
我究竟做了什么要受你讥讽?
我从来没有,永远也没希望
得到狄米特律斯的柔情目光,
年轻人,这难道还不够痛苦?
可你却还非要奚落我的短处?
以这样蔑视的方式向我求爱,
事实上,这对我不啻于伤害。
还是再见吧。但我必须承认,
我原以为你是真正的善良人。
唉,就因为女人被一个男人
抛弃,她就被另个男人贬损!

Exit HELENA 海丽娜下


LYSANDER
She sees not Hermia.—Hermia, sleep thou there.
And never mayst thou come Lysander near!
For as a surfeit of the sweetest things
The deepest loathing to the stomach brings,
Or as the heresies that men do leave
Are hated most of those they did deceive,
So thou, my surfeit and my heresy,
Of all be hated, but the most of me.—
And all my powers, address your love and might
To honor Helen and to be her knight.

拉山德
她没瞧见她。荷米娅,就睡那厢。
你往后再也不许走到拉山德近旁!
就像一个人吃了过多的甜腻食物,
肠胃中就会产生十分强烈的厌恶。
还有那些放弃信仰异端邪教的人,
因曾受蒙骗,他们对之最为痛恨。
荷米娅,你就是我的邪教和甜食,
在所有憎恶你的人中,我最恨你。
我要倾尽全力,奉献爱情和威力,
为海丽娜增添荣耀,做她的骑士。

Exit LYSANDER 拉山德下

HERMIA
(waking) Help me, Lysander, help me! Do thy best
To pluck this crawling serpent from my breast.
Ay me, for pity! What a dream was here.
Lysander, look how I do quake with fear.
Methought a serpent eat my heart away,
And you sat smiling at his cruel pray.
Lysander!—What, removed?—Lysander, lord!—
What, out of hearing, gone? No sound, no word?—
Alack, where are you? Speak, an if you hear.
Speak, of all loves! I swoon almost with fear.
No? Then I well perceive you all not nigh.
Either death or you I’ll find immediately.

荷米娅 (醒来)
拉山德,救救我!请全力以赴
将爬到我胸口上的这条蛇驱逐。
可怜的我呀!多么可怕的梦魇,
拉山德,你瞧我吓得浑身打颤。
我以为一条蛇正在吞噬我的心,
你却坐看这虐行嘴角冷笑森森。
拉山德!拉山德!你睡别处了?
怎么,听不见,走了?没回答?
你在哪?你要听见我,请说话。
为了爱请说话!我几乎吓晕了。
没有声音?那我想你不在近旁,
我要找到你,否则我即刻身亡。


Exit 荷米娅下



云天译
        

#15  《仲夏夜之梦》中的典故---- Philomel 夜莺             Go Back


Tereus Confronted with the Head of his Son Itylus (oil on canvas, painted 1636–1638), one of the late works of Flemish Baroque painter Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640) (Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain)


在《仲夏夜之梦》第二幕第二场中仙子们请夜莺唱歌,给仙后催眠:
Philomel, with melody/Sing in our sweet lullaby.

这里的Philomel 菲洛墨拉,也有一段出自奥维德《变形记》的希腊神话故事:

http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E8%8F%B2%E6%B4%9B%E5%A2%A8%E6%8B%89

“菲洛墨拉(希腊语:Φιλομήλα,字面意思是“爱歌者”)希腊神话中的一个女性人物。

菲洛墨拉为阿提刻(雅典及其附近地区)国王潘狄翁与妻子宙克西珀所生之女,是普罗克涅、厄瑞克透斯和部忒斯的妹妹。

菲洛墨拉的姐夫色雷斯国王忒柔斯凶暴好色,企图霸占菲洛墨拉,遂将自己的妻子普罗克涅藏于密林中,谎称其已死,要潘狄翁把另一个女儿送来。菲洛墨拉到达后即遭忒柔斯强奸,又被割掉了舌头。普罗克涅得知后气极,为报复竟杀死自己与忒柔斯的孩子,并将孩子的肉做成饭给忒柔斯吃,然后带菲洛墨拉逃跑。忒柔斯发觉真相后暴怒,拼命追赶两人。两姐妹在绝望中向神祈祷,天神把他们三人都变成了鸟:普罗克涅变成夜莺,菲洛墨拉变成燕子,忒柔斯变成戴胜。晚期的罗马作家不知出于什么原因改动了神话,把无舌的菲洛墨拉说成是夜莺,普罗克涅则说成燕子。

In Ovid's Metamorphoses Philomela's defiant speech is rendered (in an 18th-century English translation) as:
Still my revenge shall take its proper time,
And suit the baseness of your hellish crime.
My self, abandon'd, and devoid of shame,
Thro' the wide world your actions will proclaim;
Or tho' I'm prison'd in this lonely den,
Obscur'd, and bury'd from the sight of men,
My mournful voice the pitying rocks shall move,
And my complainings echo thro' the grove.
Hear me, o Heav'n! and, if a God be there,
Let him regard me, and accept my pray'r.”

在西方文化中,夜莺之声起初被描写成忧愁悲哀的,后来逐渐变迁,成为欢快的自然之声。英国诗人塞缪尔·泰勒·柯勒律治说,"in nature there is nothing melancholy":

First published in the collection Lyrical Ballads, "The Nightingale" (1798) is an effort by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772–1834) to move away from associations that the nightingale's song was one of melancholy and identified it with the joyous experience of nature. He remarked that "in nature there is nothing melancholy," (line 15) expressing hope "we may not thus profane / Nature’s sweet voices, always full of love / And joyance!" (lines 40–42).

关于夜莺,更多的请参见英文维基:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philomela

有两则有名的夜莺童话。一是安徒生的《夜莺》,讲夜莺和中国皇帝的故事,据说是安徒生为了纪念自己对一个歌剧歌唱家的单相思。新世纪音乐家Yanni 雅尼有一曲《夜莺》,百听不厌,当中的笛声美妙之至。网上谈到这首曲子的创作背景:

“雅尼的《夜莺》就是特意为中国而作,来自于安徒生童话,叙述一个中国皇帝和夜莺的故事。雅尼这样描述它的创作背景:’我时常聆听自然之声,因为我能从中学得保持平衡的法则。记得几年前(大约1994年),我在意大利威尼斯的时候,每当日落时分,这只小鸟(夜莺)就会来到我的窗前歌唱。它的歌声美妙如丝,令人陶醉,因为这鸟的歌声包含这么多的词汇,节奏和旋律,我为我们之间无法用对方的语言交流而深感遗憾。直到几年后,当有人向我介绍中国笛子的时候,我才发现中国笛子与夜莺鸟的歌声在音调上有着许多共同的地方,特别是在高音区。所以我决定为中国笛子谱写一首曲子。我想今天这只鸟如果能听懂我们的音乐语言并参加我们的音乐会,它一定会像这样和我们一起歌唱。‘”

另外一则童话是王尔德的《夜莺与玫瑰》。在希腊神话中,红玫瑰是爱与美之女神Aphrodite 阿佛洛狄忒的鲜血染红的。 而在王尔德的童话中,夜莺以生命染红了窗前的玫瑰。
        

#16  安徒生的《夜莺》             Go Back
Nightingale - Yanni



安徒生的《夜莺》 (中文)
http://tieba.baidu.com/p/45062015


The Nightingale

by

Hans Christian Andersen

(1844)

IN China, you know, the emperor is a Chinese, and all those about him are Chinamen also. The story I am going to tell you happened a great many years ago, so it is well to hear it now before it is forgotten. The emperor’s palace was the most beautiful in the world. It was built entirely of porcelain, and very costly, but so delicate and brittle that whoever touched it was obliged to be careful. In the garden could be seen the most singular flowers, with pretty silver bells tied to them, which tinkled so that every one who passed could not help noticing the flowers. Indeed, everything in the emperor’s garden was remarkable, and it extended so far that the gardener himself did not know where it ended. Those who travelled beyond its limits knew that there was a noble forest, with lofty trees, sloping down to the deep blue sea, and the great ships sailed under the shadow of its branches. In one of these trees lived a nightingale, who sang so beautifully that even the poor fishermen, who had so many other things to do, would stop and listen. Sometimes, when they went at night to spread their nets, they would hear her sing, and say, “Oh, is not that beautiful?” But when they returned to their fishing, they forgot the bird until the next night. Then they would hear it again, and exclaim “Oh, how beautiful is the nightingale’s song!”
Travellers from every country in the world came to the city of the emperor, which they admired very much, as well as the palace and gardens; but when they heard the nightingale, they all declared it to be the best of all. And the travellers, on their return home, related what they had seen; and learned men wrote books, containing descriptions of the town, the palace, and the gardens; but they did not forget the nightingale, which was really the greatest wonder. And those who could write poetry composed beautiful verses about the nightingale, who lived in a forest near the deep sea. The books travelled all over the world, and some of them came into the hands of the emperor; and he sat in his golden chair, and, as he read, he nodded his approval every moment, for it pleased him to find such a beautiful description of his city, his palace, and his gardens. But when he came to the words, “the nightingale is the most beautiful of all,” he exclaimed, “What is this? I know nothing of any nightingale. Is there such a bird in my empire? and even in my garden? I have never heard of it. Something, it appears, may be learnt from books.”
Then he called one of his lords-in-waiting, who was so high-bred, that when any in an inferior rank to himself spoke to him, or asked him a question, he would answer, “Pooh,” which means nothing.
“There is a very wonderful bird mentioned here, called a nightingale,” said the emperor; “they say it is the best thing in my large kingdom. Why have I not been told of it?”
“I have never heard the name,” replied the cavalier; “she has not been presented at court.”
“It is my pleasure that she shall appear this evening.” said the emperor; “the whole world knows what I possess better than I do myself.”
“I have never heard of her,” said the cavalier; “yet I will endeavor to find her.”
But where was the nightingale to be found? The nobleman went up stairs and down, through halls and passages; yet none of those whom he met had heard of the bird. So he returned to the emperor, and said that it must be a fable, invented by those who had written the book. “Your imperial majesty,” said he, “cannot believe everything contained in books; sometimes they are only fiction, or what is called the black art.”
“But the book in which I have read this account,” said the emperor, “was sent to me by the great and mighty emperor of Japan, and therefore it cannot contain a falsehood. I will hear the nightingale, she must be here this evening; she has my highest favor; and if she does not come, the whole court shall be trampled upon after supper is ended.”
“Tsing-pe!” cried the lord-in-waiting, and again he ran up and down stairs, through all the halls and corridors; and half the court ran with him, for they did not like the idea of being trampled upon. There was a great inquiry about this wonderful nightingale, whom all the world knew, but who was unknown to the court.
At last they met with a poor little girl in the kitchen, who said, “Oh, yes, I know the nightingale quite well; indeed, she can sing. Every evening I have permission to take home to my poor sick mother the scraps from the table; she lives down by the sea-shore, and as I come back I feel tired, and I sit down in the wood to rest, and listen to the nightingale’s song. Then the tears come into my eyes, and it is just as if my mother kissed me.”
“Little maiden,” said the lord-in-waiting, “I will obtain for you constant employment in the kitchen, and you shall have permission to see the emperor dine, if you will lead us to the nightingale; for she is invited for this evening to the palace.” So she went into the wood where the nightingale sang, and half the court followed her. As they went along, a cow began lowing.
“Oh,” said a young courtier, “now we have found her; what wonderful power for such a small creature; I have certainly heard it before.”
“No, that is only a cow lowing,” said the little girl; “we are a long way from the place yet.”
Then some frogs began to croak in the marsh.
“Beautiful,” said the young courtier again. “Now I hear it, tinkling like little church bells.”
“No, those are frogs,” said the little maiden; “but I think we shall soon hear her now:” and presently the nightingale began to sing.
“Hark, hark! there she is,” said the girl, “and there she sits,” she added, pointing to a little gray bird who was perched on a bough.
“Is it possible?” said the lord-in-waiting, “I never imagined it would be a little, plain, simple thing like that. She has certainly changed color at seeing so many grand people around her.”
“Little nightingale,” cried the girl, raising her voice, “our most gracious emperor wishes you to sing before him.”
“With the greatest pleasure,” said the nightingale, and began to sing most delightfully.
“It sounds like tiny glass bells,” said the lord-in-waiting, “and see how her little throat works. It is surprising that we have never heard this before; she will be a great success at court.”
“Shall I sing once more before the emperor?” asked the nightingale, who thought he was present.
“My excellent little nightingale,” said the courtier, “I have the great pleasure of inviting you to a court festival this evening, where you will gain imperial favor by your charming song.”
“My song sounds best in the green wood,” said the bird; but still she came willingly when she heard the emperor’s wish.
The palace was elegantly decorated for the occasion. The walls and floors of porcelain glittered in the light of a thousand lamps. Beautiful flowers, round which little bells were tied, stood in the corridors: what with the running to and fro and the draught, these bells tinkled so loudly that no one could speak to be heard. In the centre of the great hall, a golden perch had been fixed for the nightingale to sit on. The whole court was present, and the little kitchen-maid had received permission to stand by the door. She was not installed as a real court cook. All were in full dress, and every eye was turned to the little gray bird when the emperor nodded to her to begin. The nightingale sang so sweetly that the tears came into the emperor’s eyes, and then rolled down his cheeks, as her song became still more touching and went to every one’s heart. The emperor was so delighted that he declared the nightingale should have his gold slipper to wear round her neck, but she declined the honor with thanks: she had been sufficiently rewarded already. “I have seen tears in an emperor’s eyes,” she said, “that is my richest reward. An emperor’s tears have wonderful power, and are quite sufficient honor for me;” and then she sang again more enchantingly than ever.
“That singing is a lovely gift;” said the ladies of the court to each other; and then they took water in their mouths to make them utter the gurgling sounds of the nightingale when they spoke to any one, so thay they might fancy themselves nightingales. And the footmen and chambermaids also expressed their satisfaction, which is saying a great deal, for they are very difficult to please. In fact the nightingale’s visit was most successful. She was now to remain at court, to have her own cage, with liberty to go out twice a day, and once during the night. Twelve servants were appointed to attend her on these occasions, who each held her by a silken string fastened to her leg. There was certainly not much pleasure in this kind of flying.
The whole city spoke of the wonderful bird, and when two people met, one said “nightin,” and the other said “gale,” and they understood what was meant, for nothing else was talked of. Eleven peddlers’ children were named after her, but not of them could sing a note.
One day the emperor received a large packet on which was written “The Nightingale.” “Here is no doubt a new book about our celebrated bird,” said the emperor. But instead of a book, it was a work of art contained in a casket, an artificial nightingale made to look like a living one, and covered all over with diamonds, rubies, and sapphires. As soon as the artificial bird was wound up, it could sing like the real one, and could move its tail up and down, which sparkled with silver and gold. Round its neck hung a piece of ribbon, on which was written “The Emperor of Japan’s nightingale is poor compared with that of the Emperor of China’s.”1
“This is very beautiful,” exclaimed all who saw it, and he who had brought the artificial bird received the title of “Imperial nightingale-bringer-in-chief.”
“Now they must sing together,” said the court, “and what a duet it will be.” But they did not get on well, for the real nightingale sang in its own natural way, but the artificial bird sang only waltzes.
“That is not a fault,” said the music-master, “it is quite perfect to my taste,” so then it had to sing alone, and was as successful as the real bird; besides, it was so much prettier to look at, for it sparkled like bracelets and breast-pins. Three and thirty times did it sing the same tunes without being tired; the people would gladly have heard it again, but the emperor said the living nightingale ought to sing something. But where was she? No one had noticed her when she flew out at the open window, back to her own green woods.
“What strange conduct,” said the emperor, when her flight had been discovered; and all the courtiers blamed her, and said she was a very ungrateful creature.
“But we have the best bird after all,” said one, and then they would have the bird sing again, although it was the thirty-fourth time they had listened to the same piece, and even then they had not learnt it, for it was rather difficult. But the music-master praised the bird in the highest degree, and even asserted that it was better than a real nightingale, not only in its dress and the beautiful diamonds, but also in its musical power. “For you must perceive, my chief lord and emperor, that with a real nightingale we can never tell what is going to be sung, but with this bird everything is settled. It can be opened and explained, so that people may understand how the waltzes are formed, and why one note follows upon another.”
“This is exactly what we think,” they all replied, and then the music-master received permission to exhibit the bird to the people on the following Sunday, and the emperor commanded that they should be present to hear it sing. When they heard it they were like people intoxicated; however it must have been with drinking tea, which is quite a Chinese custom. They all said “Oh!” and held up their forefingers and nodded, but a poor fisherman, who had heard the real nightingale, said, “it sounds prettily enough, and the melodies are all alike; yet there seems something wanting, I cannot exactly tell what.”
And after this the real nightingale was banished from the empire, and the artificial bird placed on a silk cushion close to the emperor’s bed. The presents of gold and precious stones which had been received with it were round the bird, and it was now advanced to the title of “Little Imperial Toilet Singer,” and to the rank of No. 1 on the left hand; for the emperor considered the left side, on which the heart lies, as the most noble, and the heart of an emperor is in the same place as that of other people.
The music-master wrote a work, in twenty-five volumes, about the artificial bird, which was very learned and very long, and full of the most difficult Chinese words; yet all the people said they had read it, and understood it, for fear of being thought stupid and having their bodies trampled upon.
So a year passed, and the emperor, the court, and all the other Chinese knew every little turn in the artificial bird’s song; and for that same reason it pleased them better. They could sing with the bird, which they often did. The street-boys sang, “Zi-zi-zi, cluck, cluck, cluck,” and the emperor himself could sing it also. It was really most amusing.
One evening, when the artificial bird was singing its best, and the emperor lay in bed listening to it, something inside the bird sounded “whizz.” Then a spring cracked. “Whir-r-r-r” went all the wheels, running round, and then the music stopped. The emperor immediately sprang out of bed, and called for his physician; but what could he do? Then they sent for a watchmaker; and, after a great deal of talking and examination, the bird was put into something like order; but he said that it must be used very carefully, as the barrels were worn, and it would be impossible to put in new ones without injuring the music. Now there was great sorrow, as the bird could only be allowed to play once a year; and even that was dangerous for the works inside it. Then the music-master made a little speech, full of hard words, and declared that the bird was as good as ever; and, of course no one contradicted him.
Five years passed, and then a real grief came upon the land. The Chinese really were fond of their emperor, and he now lay so ill that he was not expected to live. Already a new emperor had been chosen and the people who stood in the street asked the lord-in-waiting how the old emperor was; but he only said, “Pooh!” and shook his head.
Cold and pale lay the emperor in his royal bed; the whole court thought he was dead, and every one ran away to pay homage to his successor. The chamberlains went out to have a talk on the matter, and the ladies’-maids invited company to take coffee. Cloth had been laid down on the halls and passages, so that not a footstep should be heard, and all was silent and still. But the emperor was not yet dead, although he lay white and stiff on his gorgeous bed, with the long velvet curtains and heavy gold tassels. A window stood open, and the moon shone in upon the emperor and the artificial bird. The poor emperor, finding he could scarcely breathe with a strange weight on his chest, opened his eyes, and saw Death sitting there. He had put on the emperor’s golden crown, and held in one hand his sword of state, and in the other his beautiful banner. All around the bed and peeping through the long velvet curtains, were a number of strange heads, some very ugly, and others lovely and gentle-looking. These were the emperor’s good and bad deeds, which stared him in the face now Death sat at his heart.
“Do you remember this?” “Do you recollect that?” they asked one after another, thus bringing to his remembrance circumstances that made the perspiration stand on his brow.
“I know nothing about it,” said the emperor. “Music! music!” he cried; “the large Chinese drum! that I may not hear what they say.” But they still went on, and Death nodded like a Chinaman to all they said. “Music! music!” shouted the emperor. “You little precious golden bird, sing, pray sing! I have given you gold and costly presents; I have even hung my golden slipper round your neck. Sing! sing!” But the bird remained silent. There was no one to wind it up, and therefore it could not sing a note.
Death continued to stare at the emperor with his cold, hollow eyes, and the room was fearfully still. Suddenly there came through the open window the sound of sweet music. Outside, on the bough of a tree, sat the living nightingale. She had heard of the emperor’s illness, and was therefore come to sing to him of hope and trust. And as she sung, the shadows grew paler and paler; the blood in the emperor’s veins flowed more rapidly, and gave life to his weak limbs; and even Death himself listened, and said, “Go on, little nightingale, go on.”
“Then will you give me the beautiful golden sword and that rich banner? and will you give me the emperor’s crown?” said the bird.
So Death gave up each of these treasures for a song; and the nightingale continued her singing. She sung of the quiet churchyard, where the white roses grow, where the elder-tree wafts its perfume on the breeze, and the fresh, sweet grass is moistened by the mourners’ tears. Then Death longed to go and see his garden, and floated out through the window in the form of a cold, white mist.
“Thanks, thanks, you heavenly little bird. I know you well. I banished you from my kingdom once, and yet you have charmed away the evil faces from my bed, and banished Death from my heart, with your sweet song. How can I reward you?”
“You have already rewarded me,” said the nightingale. “I shall never forget that I drew tears from your eyes the first time I sang to you. These are the jewels that rejoice a singer’s heart. But now sleep, and grow strong and well again. I will sing to you again.”
And as she sung, the emperor fell into a sweet sleep; and how mild and refreshing that slumber was! When he awoke, strengthened and restored, the sun shone brightly through the window; but not one of his servants had returned—they all believed he was dead; only the nightingale still sat beside him, and sang.
“You must always remain with me,” said the emperor. “You shall sing only when it pleases you; and I will break the artificial bird into a thousand pieces.”
“No; do not do that,” replied the nightingale; “the bird did very well as long as it could. Keep it here still. I cannot live in the palace, and build my nest; but let me come when I like. I will sit on a bough outside your window, in the evening, and sing to you, so that you may be happy, and have thoughts full of joy. I will sing to you of those who are happy, and those who suffer; of the good and the evil, who are hidden around you. The little singing bird flies far from you and your court to the home of the fisherman and the peasant’s cot. I love your heart better than your crown; and yet something holy lingers round that also. I will come, I will sing to you; but you must promise me one thing.”
“Everything,” said the emperor, who, having dressed himself in his imperial robes, stood with the hand that held the heavy golden sword pressed to his heart.
“I only ask one thing,” she replied; “let no one know that you have a little bird who tells you everything. It will be best to conceal it.” So saying, the nightingale flew away.
The servants now came in to look after the dead emperor; when, lo! there he stood, and, to their astonishment, said, “Good morning.”

The End


斯特拉文斯基 - 安徒生童话歌剧《皇帝的夜莺》

http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMTE1NTE3NjUy.html
        

#17  The Nightingale and the Rose by Oscar Wilde 王尔德的《夜莺与玫瑰》             Go Back
王尔德的《夜莺与玫瑰》 (中文)
http://v.book.ifeng.com/book/ts/11599/1116199.htm



The Nightingale and the Rose
by Oscar Wilde

http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/NigRos.shtml


'She said that she would dance with me if I brought her red roses,' cried the young Student; 'but in all my garden there is no red rose.'

From her nest in the holm-oak tree the Nightingale heard him, and she looked out through the leaves, and wondered.

'No red rose in all my garden!' he cried, and his beautiful eyes filled with tears. 'Ah, on what little things does happiness depend! I have read all that the wise men have written, and all the secrets of philosophy are mine, yet for want of a red rose is my life made wretched.'

'Here at last is a true lover,' said the Nightingale. 'Night after night have I sung of him, though I knew him not: night after night have I told his story to the stars, and now I see him. His hair is dark as the hyacinth-blossom, and his lips are red as the rose of his desire; but passion has made his lace like pale Ivory, and sorrow has set her seal upon his brow.'

'The Prince gives a ball to-morrow night,' murmured the young Student, 'and my love will be of the company. If I bring her a red rose she will dance with me till dawn. If I bring her a red rose, I shall hold her in my arms, and she will lean her head upon my shoulder, and her hand will be clasped in mine. But there is no red rose in my garden, so I shall sit lonely, and she will pass me by. She will have no heed of me, and my heart will break.'

'Here indeed is the true lover,' said the Nightingale. 'What I sing of he suffers: what is joy to me, to him is pain. Surely Love is a wonderful thing. It is more precious than emeralds, and dearer than fine opals. Pearls and pomegranates cannot buy it, nor is it set forth in the market-place. it may not be purchased of the merchants, 'or can it be weighed out in the balance for gold.'

< 2 >
'The musicians will sit in their gallery,' said the young Student, 'and play upon their stringed instruments, and my love will dance to the sound of the harp and the violin. She will dance so lightly that her feet will not touch the floor, and the courtiers in their gay dresses will throng round her. But with me she will not dance, for I have no red rose to give her;' and he flung himself down on the grass, and buried his face in his hands, and wept.

'Why is he weeping?' asked a little Green Lizard, as he ran past him with his tail in the air.

'Why, indeed?' said a Butterfly, who was fluttering about after a sunbeam.

'Why, indeed?' whispered a Daisy to his neighbour, in a soft, low voice.

'He is weeping for a red rose,' said the Nightingale.

'For a red rose!' they cried; 'how very ridiculous!' and the little Lizard, who was something of a cynic, laughed outright.

But the Nightingale understood the secret of the Student's sorrow, and she sat silent in the oak-tree, and thought about the mystery of Love.

Suddenly she spread her brown wings for flight, and soared into the air. She passed through the grove like a shadow, and like a shadow she sailed across the garden.

In the centre of the grass-plot was standing a beautiful Rose-tree, and when she saw it, she flew over to it, and lit upon a spray.

'Give me a red rose,' she cried, 'and I will sing you my sweetest song.'

But the Tree shook its head.

'My roses are white,' it answered; 'as white as the foam of the sea, and whiter than the snow upon the mountain. But go to my brother who grows round the old sun-dial, and perhaps he will give you what you want.'

< 3 >
So the Nightingale flew over to the Rose-tree that was growing round the old sun-dial.

'Give me a red rose,' she cried, 'and I will sing you my sweetest song.'

But the Tree shook its head.

'My roses are yellow,' it answered; 'as yellow as the hair of the mermaiden who sits upon an amber throne, and yellower than the daffodil that blooms in the meadow before the mower comes with his scythe. But go to my brother who grows beneath the Student's window, and perhaps he will give you what you want.'

So the Nightingale flew over to the Rose-tree that was growing beneath the Student's window.

'Give me a red rose,' she cried, 'and I will sing you my sweetest song.'

But the Tree shook its head.

'My roses are red,' it answered, 'as red as the feet of the dove, and redder than the great fans of coral that wave and wave in the ocean-cavern. But the winter has chilled my veins, and the frost has nipped my buds, and the storm has broken my branches, and I shall have no roses at all this year.'

'One red rose is all I want,' cried the Nightingale, 'only one red rose! Is there no way by which I can get it?'

'There is a way,' answered the Tree; 'but it is so terrible that I dare not tell it to you.'

'Tell it to me,' said the Nightingale, 'I am not afraid.'

'If you want a red rose,' said the Tree, 'you must build it out of music by moonlight, and stain it with your own heart's-blood. You must sing to me with your breast against a thorn. All night long you must sing to me, and the thorn must pierce your heart, and your life-blood must flow into my veins, and become mine.'

< 4 >
'Death is a great price to pay for a red rose,' cried the Nightingale, 'and Life is very dear to all. It is pleasant to sit in the green wood, and to watch the Sun in his chariot of gold, and the Moon in her chariot of pearl. Sweet is the scent of the hawthorn, and sweet are the bluebells that hide in the valley, and the heather that blows on the hill. Yet Love is better than Life, and what is the heart of a bird compared to the heart of a man?'

So she spread her brown wings for flight, and soared into the air. She swept over the garden like a shadow, and like a shadow she sailed through the grove.

The young Student was still lying on the grass, where she had left him, and the tears were not yet dry in his beautiful eyes.

'Be happy,' cried the Nightingale, 'be happy; you shall have your red rose. I will build it out of music by moonlight, and stain it with my own heart's-blood. All that I ask of you in return is that you will be a true lover, for Love is wiser than Philosophy, though she is wise, and mightier than Power, though he is mighty. Flame-coloured are his wings, and coloured like flame is his body. His lips are sweet as honey, and his breath is like frankincense.'

The Student looked up from the grass, and listened, but he could not understand what the Nightingale was saying to him, for he only knew the things that are written down in books.

But the Oak-tree understood, and felt sad, for he was very fond of the little Nightingale who had built her nest in his branches.

'Sing me one last song,' he whispered; 'I shall feel very lonely when you are gone.'

So the Nightingale sang to the Oak-tree, and her voice was like water bubbling from a silver jar.

< 5 >
When she had finished her song the Student got lip, and pulled a note-book and a lead-pencil out of his pocket.

'She has form,' he said to himself, as he walked away through the grove - 'that cannot be denied to her; but has she got feeling? I am afraid not. In fact, she is like most artists; she is all style, without any sincerity. She would not sacrifice herself for others. She thinks merely of music, and everybody knows that the arts are selfish. Still, it must be admitted that she has some beautiful notes in her voice. What a pity it is that they do not mean anything, or do any practical good.' And he went into his room, and lay down on his little pallet-bed, and began to think of his love; and, after a time, he fell asleep.

And when the Moon shone in the heavens the Nightingale flew to the Rose-tree, and set her breast against the thorn. All night long she sang with her breast against the thorn, and the cold crystal Moon leaned down and listened. All night long she sang, and the thorn went deeper and deeper into her breast, and her life-blood ebbed away from her.

She sang first of the birth of love in the heart of a boy and a girl. And on the topmost spray of the Rose-tree there blossomed a marvellous rose, petal following petal, as song followed song. Yale was it, at first, as the mist that hangs over the river - pale as the feet of the morning, and silver as the wings of the dawn. As the shadow of a rose in a mirror of silver, as the shadow of a rose in a water-pool, so was the rose that blossomed on the topmost spray of the Tree.

But the Tree cried to the Nightingale to press closer against the thorn. 'Press closer, little Nightingale,' cried the Tree, 'or the Day will come before the rose is finished.'

So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and louder and louder grew her song, for she sang of the birth of passion in the soul of a man and a maid.

< 6 >
And a delicate flush of pink came into the leaves of the rose, like the flush in the face of the bridegroom when he kisses the lips of the bride. But the thorn had not yet reached her heart, so the rose's heart remained white, for only a Nightingale's heart's-blood can crimson the heart of a rose.

And the Tree cried to the Nightingale to press closer against the thorn. 'Press closer, little Nightingale,' cried the Tree, 'or the Day will come before the rose is finished.'

So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and the thorn touched her heart, and a fierce pang of pain shot through her. Bitter, bitter was the pain, and wilder and wilder grew her song, for she sang of the Love that is perfected by Death, of the Love that dies not in the tomb.

And the marvellous rose became crimson, like the rose of the eastern sky. Crimson was the girdle of petals, and crimson as a ruby was the heart.

But the Nightingale's voice grew fainter, and her little wings began to beat, and a film came over her eyes. Fainter and fainter grew her song, and she felt something choking her in her throat.

Then she gave one last burst of music. The white Moon heard it, and she forgot the dawn, and lingered on in the sky. The red rose heard it, and it trembled all over with ecstasy, and opened its petals to the cold morning air. Echo bore it to her purple cavern in the hills, and woke the sleeping shepherds from their dreams. It floated through the reeds of the river, and they carried its message to the sea.

'Look, look!' cried the Tree, 'the rose is finished now;' but the Nightingale made no answer, for she was lying dead in the long grass, with the thorn in her heart.

And at noon the Student opened his window and looked out.

< 7 >
'Why, what a wonderful piece of luck! he cried; 'here is a red rose! I have never seen any rose like it in all my life. It is so beautiful that I am sure it has a long Latin name;' and he leaned down and plucked it.

Then he put on his hat, and ran up to the Professor's house with the rose in his hand.

The daughter of the Professor was sitting in the doorway winding blue silk on a reel, and her little dog was lying at her feet.

'You said that you would dance with me if I brought you a red rose,' cried the Student. Here is the reddest rose in all the world. You will wear it to-night next your heart, and as we dance together it will tell you how I love you.'

But the girl frowned.

'I am afraid it will not go with my dress,' she answered; 'and, besides, the Chamberlain's nephew has sent me some real jewels, and everybody knows that jewels cost far more than flowers.'

'Well, upon my word, you are very ungrateful,' said the Student angrily; and he threw the rose into the street, where it fell into the gutter, and a cart-wheel went over it.

'Ungrateful!' said the girl. 'I tell you what, you are very rude; and, after all, who are you? Only a Student. Why, I don't believe you have even got silver buckles to your shoes as the Chamberlain's nephew has;' and she got up from her chair and went into the house.

'What a silly thing Love is,' said the Student as he walked away. 'It is not half as useful as Logic, for it does not prove anything, and it is always telling one of things that are not going to happen, and making one believe things that are not true. In fact, it is quite unpractical, and, as in this age to be practical is everything, I shall go back to Philosophy and study Metaphysics.'

< 8 >
So he returned to his room and pulled out a great dusty book, and began to read.
        

#19  《仲夏夜之梦》第三幕 第一场             Go Back



ACT 3, SCENE 1. The wood. TITANIA lying asleep.

第三幕,第一场。林子。 泰坦妮娅卧眠

Enter QUINCE, SNUG, BOTTOM, FLUTE, SNOUT, and STARVELING

昆斯,斯纳格,波特穆,弗鲁特,斯诺特,斯达佛凌上

BOTTOM
Are we all met?

波特穆
大伙都到齐了吗?

QUINCE
Pat, pat; and here's a marvellous convenient place
for our rehearsal. This green plot shall be our
stage, this hawthorn-brake our tiring-house; and we
will do it in action as we will do it before the duke.

昆斯
都很准时。都很准时。
这里做排练场地真是又好又方便。
这块绿地可以当舞台,
这片山楂丛做化妆间,
我们表演时要一丝不苟,好比公爵就在台前。

(Pat, pat, in the very nick of time )

BOTTOM
Peter Quince,--

波特穆
彼得。昆斯----

QUINCE
What sayest thou, bully Bottom?

昆斯
波特穆,你这家伙要说什么?

BOTTOM
There are things in this comedy of Pyramus and
Thisby that will never please. First, Pyramus must
draw a sword to kill himself; which the ladies
cannot abide. How answer you that?

波特穆
《皮拉摩斯和提斯柏》这出剧,有些戏很难讨喜。
第一,皮拉摩斯必须拔剑自杀;女士们看了恐怕受不了。
你说该怎么处理这个问题?

SNOUT
By'r lakin, a parlous fear.

斯诺特
圣母玛利亚在上,这可真有点悬。

STARVELING
I believe we must leave the killing out, when all is done.

斯达佛凌
我想,整出剧里,自戕那场戏还是不演罢了。

BOTTOM
Not a whit: I have a device to make all well.
Write me a prologue; and let the prologue seem to
say, we will do no harm with our swords, and that
Pyramus is not killed indeed; and, for the more
better assurance, tell them that I, Pyramus, am not
Pyramus, but Bottom the weaver: this will put them
out of fear.

波特穆
大可不必。俺自有妙计,保证皆大欢喜。
给俺写段开场白。开场白似乎可以这么说:
俺们的剑决不会伤到人,皮拉摩斯其实没死。
要么干脆挑明了,告诉他们,俺,皮拉摩斯,
并不是什么皮拉摩斯,只不过是织工波特穆。
这么一来,就不会吓到她们了。

QUINCE
Well, we will have such a prologue; and it shall be
written in eight and six.

昆斯
好吧,那咱们就写这么一段开场白,
一行八音节,一行六音节,隔行转换。

BOTTOM
No, make it two more; let it be written in eight and eight.

波特穆
等等,还是添两个音节,写成八八音节。

SNOUT
Will not the ladies be afeard of the lion?

斯诺特
女士们看见狮子会不会花容失色?

STARVELING
I fear it, I promise you.

斯达佛凌
说实话,我可是担心她们会给吓着。

BOTTOM
Masters, you ought to consider with yourselves: to
bring in--God shield us!--a lion among ladies, is a
most dreadful thing; for there is not a more fearful
wild-fowl than your lion living; and we ought to
look to 't.

波特穆
师傅们,你们心里都掂量一番:把一头狮子带到女士们当中---上帝保佑!--- 那可够吓人的;没什么野兽比狮子更可怕。咱们得好好考虑考虑。

SNOUT
Therefore another prologue must tell he is not a lion.

斯诺特
那就需要另一段开场白,说他不是真狮子。

BOTTOM
Nay, you must name his name, and half his face must
be seen through the lion's neck: and he himself
must speak through, saying thus, or to the same
defect,--'Ladies,'--or 'Fair-ladies--I would wish
You,'--or 'I would request you,'--or 'I would
entreat you,--not to fear, not to tremble: my life
for yours. If you think I come hither as a lion, it
were pity of my life: no I am no such thing; I am a
man as other men are;' and there indeed let him name
his name, and tell them plainly he is Snug the joiner.

波特穆
嗯,你必须宣布他的名字,让他自己的半边脸露在狮子戏装外头,他还得说些诸如此类的话:“女士们”,或者“尊贵的女士们,我希望你们,”--- 或者, “我要求你们”, -- 或者 “我请求你们,莫害怕,莫发抖,我拿自个的生命担保。你们要是以为我是哪儿跑来的真狮子,那我就惨了。我可不是什么狮子,我跟别人没半点两样,” 然后让他说出自己的姓名,明确告诉女士们,他是木匠斯纳格。

QUINCE
Well it shall be so. But there is two hard things;
that is, to bring the moonlight into a chamber; for,
you know, Pyramus and Thisby meet by moonlight.

昆斯
好吧,就这么着。不过,还有两桩事不好办。
其一,室内要有月光。你晓得,皮拉摩斯和提斯柏
是在月光下约会的。


SNOUT
Doth the moon shine that night we play our play?

斯纳格
我们那晚演出时有月光吗?

BOTTOM
A calendar, a calendar! look in the almanac; find
out moonshine, find out moonshine.

波特穆
拿日历来,拿日历来! 快查看年历。
瞧瞧有没有月亮,瞧瞧有没有月亮。

QUINCE
Yes, it doth shine that night.

昆斯
有,那晚有月亮。

BOTTOM
Why, then may you leave a casement of the great
chamber window, where we play, open, and the moon
may shine in at the casement.

波特穆
好,那你可以打开演出大厅的一扇窗,月亮就会照进窗来。

QUINCE
Ay; or else one must come in with a bush of thorns
and a lanthorn, and say he comes to disfigure, or to
present, the person of Moonshine. Then, there is
another thing: we must have a wall in the great
chamber; for Pyramus and Thisby says the story, did
talk through the chink of a wall.

昆斯
是啊。不然的话,一个人得抱着捆柴打着灯笼上台,说他装扮成或代表月光。还有一个难题:演出厅里必须有一堵墙,因为故事里说,皮拉摩斯和提斯柏是透着墙缝说话的。

SNOUT
You can never bring in a wall. What say you, Bottom?

斯诺特
你可没法搬一堵墙进来。波特穆,你说呢?

BOTTOM
Some man or other must present Wall: and let him
have some plaster, or some loam, or some rough-cast
about him, to signify wall; and let him hold his
fingers thus, and through that cranny shall Pyramus
and Thisby whisper.

波特穆
那得找个人当墙:给他身上涂些土灰泥巴之类的,来象征一堵墙;
让他的手指那么伸着,透过指缝,皮拉摩斯和提斯柏轻声交谈。

QUINCE
If that may be, then all is well. Come, sit down,
every mother's son, and rehearse your parts.
Pyramus, you begin: when you have spoken your
speech, enter into that brake: and so every one
according to his cue.

昆斯
如果那样的话,就万事大吉了。来,大伙儿都坐下,
排练自己的戏份。
皮拉摩斯,你先来:你说完台词,就到那片树丛里。其余的人,
接上他的台词继续演。


Enter PUCK behind 帕克自后面上

PUCK
What hempen home-spuns have we swaggering here,
So near the cradle of the fairy queen?
What, a play toward! I'll be an auditor;
An actor too, perhaps, if I see cause.

帕克
哪些乡巴佬在这儿晃来晃去,
就在我们仙后安歇处近旁?
哇,在排一出戏! 我要当听众,
兴许逮到机会,还可以当演员呢。

QUINCE
Speak, Pyramus. Thisby, stand forth.

昆斯
皮拉摩斯,开说。 提斯柏,上前来。

BOTTOM
Thisby, the flowers of odious savours sweet,--

波特穆 (扮皮拉摩斯)
提斯柏,这些花闻起来香呼呼啊,

QUINCE
Odours, odours.

昆斯
香馥馥,香馥馥。

BOTTOM
--odours savours sweet:
So hath thy breath, my dearest Thisby dear.
But hark, a voice! stay thou but here awhile,
And by and by I will to thee appear.

波特穆
--- 香馥馥:
如同你的气息,我最亲爱的提斯柏。
但听呀,那声音!你且在此稍等片刻,
咱去去就来。

Exit 波特穆下

PUCK
A stranger Pyramus than e'er played here.

帕克
这是我见过的演得最怪的皮拉摩斯。

Exit 帕克下

FLUTE
Must I speak now?

弗鲁特
现在该我说了吗?

QUINCE
Ay, marry, must you; for you must understand he goes
but to see a noise that he heard, and is to come again.

昆斯
对,该你了。你要理解,他是去瞧瞧那声音是怎么回事,马上就会回来。

FLUTE
Most radiant Pyramus, most lily-white of hue,
Of colour like the red rose on triumphant brier,
Most brisky juvenal and eke most lovely Jew,
As true as truest horse that yet would never tire,
I'll meet thee, Pyramus, at Ninny's tomb.

弗鲁特 (扮提斯柏)
光彩照人的皮拉摩斯,百合般洁白,
像绚丽的花丛上绽放的玫瑰般红艳,
你洋溢着青春,你是珠宝令我珍爱,
像最忠实的骏马,你永远不知疲倦。
皮拉摩斯,我要与你聚于宁尼之墓。

(Jew: an abbreviation of jewel; Ninny: Ninus)


QUINCE
'Ninus' tomb,' man: why, you must not speak that
yet; that you answer to Pyramus: you speak all your
part at once, cues and all Pyramus enter: your cue
is past; it is, 'never tire.'

昆斯
伙计,是“尼纳斯之墓”。 嗨,你先别急着说那句,
那是回应皮拉摩斯的话。你把你的戏份,包括尾白什么的,
一口气全都说完了。
皮拉摩斯,进来。你刚才错过尾白了,就是“永不疲倦”那句。

FLUTE
O,--As true as truest horse, that yet would
never tire.

弗鲁特
喔,---- 像最忠实的骏马,你永远不知疲倦。

Re-enter PUCK, and BOTTOM with an ass's head

帕克和戴着驴面具的波特穆重上

BOTTOM
If I were fair, Thisby, I were only thine.

波特穆
提斯柏,假使我英俊,我仍然只属于你一人。

QUINCE
O monstrous! O strange! we are haunted. Pray,
masters! fly, masters! Help!

昆斯
哎呀怪物!奇哉怪哉!鬼怪缠上咱们了。
大伙祷告吧!大伙快逃啊!救命救命!

Exeunt QUINCE, SNUG, FLUTE, SNOUT, and STARVELING

昆斯,斯纳格,弗鲁特,斯诺特,斯达佛凌下

PUCK
I'll follow you, I'll lead you about a round,
Through bog, through bush, through brake, through brier:
Sometime a horse I'll be, sometime a hound,
A hog, a headless bear, sometime a fire;
And neigh, and bark, and grunt, and roar, and burn,
Like horse, hound, hog, bear, fire, at every turn.

帕克
我要跟踪你们,引你们兜圈子,
穿过沼泽地,密树丛林和荆棘;
我有时是一匹马,有时是猎犬,
有时是野猪,无头熊,或烈焰;
我长嘶狂吠嚎叫大吼噼啪作响,
就像奔马猎犬野猪大熊和火光。


Exit 帕克下

BOTTOM
Why do they run away? this is a knavery of them to
make me afeard.

波特穆
他们咋都跑走了?准是他们耍花招来吓俺。

Re-enter SNOUT 斯诺特重上

SNOUT
O Bottom, thou art changed! what do I see on thee?

斯诺特
哟,波特穆,你变样了!你头上是啥玩意?

BOTTOM
What do you see? you see an asshead of your own, do
you?

波特穆
你看到啥了? 你瞧见你自个的驴脑袋了?

Exit SNOUT 斯诺特下

Re-enter QUINCE 昆斯重上

QUINCE
Bless thee, Bottom! bless thee! thou art
translated.

昆斯
上帝保佑你,波特穆!上帝保佑你!你变形了。


Exit 昆斯下

BOTTOM
I see their knavery: this is to make an ass of me;
to fright me, if they could. But I will not stir
from this place, do what they can: I will walk up
and down here, and I will sing, that they shall hear
I am not afraid.

Sings

The ousel cock so black of hue,
With orange-tawny bill,
The throstle with his note so true,
The wren with little quill,--

波特穆
他们的诡计俺识破了:不过是想愚弄俺,
吓吓俺。随他们怎么着,俺就是不离开这儿:
俺要在这儿走来晃去,还要哼哼小曲,
让他们听听,俺一点都不怕。

(唱)

小黑鸟身披黑羽毛
长着橘褐色小嘴巴,
画眉鸟声音清脆脆,
鹪鹩叫起来细又尖。



TITANIA
[Awaking] What angel wakes me from my flowery bed?

泰坦尼娅
(醒来)是哪位天使将我从花床上唤醒?

BOTTOM
[Sings]
The finch, the sparrow and the lark,
The plain-song cuckoo gray,
Whose note full many a man doth mark,
And dares not answer nay;--
for, indeed, who would set his wit to so foolish
a bird? who would give a bird the lie, though he cry
'cuckoo' never so?

波特穆
(唱)
燕雀麻雀和百灵鸟,
灰杜鹃唱歌真单调,
男人们听到这歌声,
连个不字都不敢哼;
就是呀,谁愿花时间跟一只蠢鸟斗嘴呢?
就算杜鹃鸟称他是乌龟,
谁又想去争辩,谴责那只鸟撒谎呢?

TITANIA
I pray thee, gentle mortal, sing again:
Mine ear is much enamour'd of thy note;
So is mine eye enthralled to thy shape;
And thy fair virtue's force perforce doth move me
On the first view to say, to swear, I love thee.

泰坦尼娅
温柔的凡人,请你继续唱吧,
你的歌声灌醉了我的双耳,
你的身体迷惑了我的眼眸,
你的美德魅力就这么打动了我
第一眼见到你,我就发誓爱你。

BOTTOM
Methinks, mistress, you should have little reason
for that: and yet, to say the truth, reason and
love keep little company together now-a-days; the
more the pity that some honest neighbours will not
make them friends. Nay, I can gleek upon occasion.

波特穆
小姐,俺觉得你那么想没啥理由。
不过说老实话,现如今理智和爱情
难得手拉手;那些诚实的芳邻们
也不帮他俩牵个线,多遗憾哪。
哈哈,俺开开玩笑而已。

TITANIA
Thou art as wise as thou art beautiful.

泰坦尼娅
你真是又英俊,又聪明。

BOTTOM
Not so, neither: but if I had wit enough to get out
of this wood, I have enough to serve mine own turn.

波特穆
哪里哪里。俺要是脑袋瓜够用,能跑出这片林子,
就心满意足了。

TITANIA
Out of this wood do not desire to go:
Thou shalt remain here, whether thou wilt or no.
I am a spirit of no common rate;
The summer still doth tend upon my state;
And I do love thee: therefore, go with me;
I'll give thee fairies to attend on thee,
And they shall fetch thee jewels from the deep,
And sing while thou on pressed flowers dost sleep;
And I will purge thy mortal grossness so
That thou shalt like an airy spirit go.
Peaseblossom! Cobweb! Moth! and Mustardseed!

泰坦尼娅
你可别想着跑出这片林子,
愿不愿意,你都得呆这里。
我可不是什么一般的精灵,
连夏天都得听从我的指令。
你跟着我吧,瞧我多爱你,
我会叫仙子们好好服侍你;
她们会从海里给你捞珠宝,
给睡在花床上的你唱小调;
我要将你尘世的污垢洗涤,
让你飞来飞去若轻灵仙子。
豆花!蛛网!飞蛾!芥菜籽!

Enter PEASEBLOSSOM, COBWEB, MOTH, and MUSTARDSEED

豆花,蛛网,飞蛾,芥菜籽四仙子上

PEASEBLOSSOM
Ready.

豆花
听命。

COBWEB
And I.

蛛网
到。

MOTH
And I.

飞蛾
到。

MUSTARDSEED
And I.

芥菜籽
到。

ALL
Where shall we go?

四仙子
您要我们上哪去?

TITANIA
Be kind and courteous to this gentleman;
Hop in his walks and gambol in his eyes;
Feed him with apricocks and dewberries,
With purple grapes, green figs, and mulberries;
The honey-bags steal from the humble-bees,
And for night-tapers crop their waxen thighs
And light them at the fiery glow-worm's eyes,
To have my love to bed and to arise;
And pluck the wings from Painted butterflies
To fan the moonbeams from his sleeping eyes:
Nod to him, elves, and do him courtesies.

泰坦尼娅
你们要好生服侍这位先生,
蹦蹦跳跳引路让他好心情;
给他吃野莓紫葡萄和杏子,
还有绿色无花果和桑椹子。
去把蜜蜂们的小蜜囊盗取,
剪下裹蜡的蜜蜂腿做蜡烛,
用炙热萤火虫把蜡烛点燃,
来照着我的爱人晨起夜眠;
摘下蝴蝶斑斓的彩色翅膀,
扇去他睡眼上的莹莹月光。
小精灵们,来,给他鞠躬。


PEASEBLOSSOM
Hail, mortal!

豆花
凡人,给您请安!

COBWEB
Hail!

蛛网
给您请安!

MOTH
Hail!

飞蛾
给您请安!

MUSTARDSEED
Hail!

芥菜籽
给您请安!


BOTTOM
I cry your worship's mercy, heartily: I beseech your
worship's name.

波特穆
俺从心底里恳求各位谅解。请问您尊姓大名?

COBWEB
Cobweb.

蛛网
蛛网。

BOTTOM
I shall desire you of more acquaintance, good Master
Cobweb: if I cut my finger, I shall make bold with
you. Your name, honest gentleman?

波特穆
俺非常希望更多地了解您,好蛛网先生。
俺要是手指割破了,可要斗胆用您包扎。
诚实的先生,请问您贵姓?

[ the cobweb film is sometimes applied to a cut by way of plaster]

PEASEBLOSSOM
Peaseblossom.

豆花
豆花。

BOTTOM
I pray you, commend me to Mistress Squash, your
mother, and to Master Peascod, your father. Good
Master Peaseblossom, I shall desire you of more
acquaintance too. Your name, I beseech you, sir?

波特穆
请您代俺问候令堂豆荚女士和令尊豆荚先生。
好豆花先生,俺也希望更多地了解您。
先生,请问您尊名?

MUSTARDSEED
Mustardseed.

芥菜籽
芥菜籽。

BOTTOM
Good Master Mustardseed, I know your patience well:
that same cowardly, giant-like ox-beef hath
devoured many a gentleman of your house: I promise
you your kindred had made my eyes water ere now. I
desire your more acquaintance, good Master
Mustardseed.

波特穆
好芥菜籽先生,您的苦处俺一清二楚:
那懦弱庞大的牛肉把你家族好多成员都当佐料吞吃了。
咱不说瞎话,你家亲戚有时让俺眼睛潮呼呼的。
好芥菜籽先生,俺真希望多了解您。

TITANIA
Come, wait upon him; lead him to my bower.
The moon methinks looks with a watery eye;
And when she weeps, weeps every little flower,
Lamenting some enforced chastity.
Tie up my love's tongue bring him silently.

泰坦尼娅
来,服侍他。领他去我闺房。
月亮的面孔看上去眼泪汪汪。
她一哭,小花们都泪如涌潮,
哀悼着那被强迫持守的贞操。
把我的爱人静悄悄地带过去。

[enforced chastity 有两种不同解读,见注]

Exeunt 众人下


云天译


1.

http://cmc.uib.no/dream/comments/enforced_chastity.html

Titania speaks of flowers and chastity:

The moon methinks looks with a watery eye;
And when she weeps, weeps every little flower,
Lamenting some enforced chastity. (III i 191-3)

This passage can be interpreted in at least two ways, that are clearly opposed to each other. Brooks and many others assume that Titania means the flowers weep because they have lost their chastity against their will: "when the moon weeps, flowers in sympathy mourn the rapes they have suffered" (Brooks 1983: cxxix).

But maybe the moon and the flowers weep because they are forced to be chaste when they would prefer not to be so? As Michael Andrew writes, "Titania is neither the patroness nor the personal exponent of chastity;"one could indeed argue she is quite the opposite. And though the moon is sometimes associated with virginity, it is also a symbol of fertility. Andrew thus concludes:

Considered in the light of this moon, Titania's meaning is clear: women in love are sometimes chaste against their wills. (..) "enforced chastity" is chastity which has been denied the opportunity Titania does not mean to deny herself. (Andrews 1984: 188)




2.

William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream
edited by Harold Bloom


Last modified on 06/25/14 02:13
        

#20  《仲夏夜之梦》第三幕 第二场             Go Back
ACT III. SCENE II. Another part of the wood.

第三幕。 第二场。 林子另一处

Enter OBERON 奥布朗上

OBERON
I wonder if Titania be awaked;
Then, what it was that next came in her eye,
Which she must dote on in extremity.
Enter PUCK
Here comes my messenger.
How now, mad spirit!
What night-rule now about this haunted grove?

奥布朗
不知道泰坦尼娅是否醒了。
不管醒来第一眼看见什么,
她都会发疯地爱上。
( 帕克上)
我的信使来了。
你好吗,疯狂的精灵!
你在这妖魅作祟的林子里搞什么鬼了?

PUCK
My mistress with a monster is in love.
Near to her close and consecrated bower,
While she was in her dull and sleeping hour,
A crew of patches, rude mechanicals,
That work for bread upon Athenian stalls,
Were met together to rehearse a play
Intended for great Theseus' nuptial-day.
The shallowest thick-skin of that barren sort,
Who Pyramus presented, in their sport
Forsook his scene and enter'd in a brake
When I did him at this advantage take,
An ass's nole I fixed on his head:
Anon his Thisbe must be answered,
And forth my mimic comes. When they him spy,
As wild geese that the creeping fowler eye,
Or russet-pated choughs, many in sort,
Rising and cawing at the gun's report,
Sever themselves and madly sweep the sky,
So, at his sight, away his fellows fly;
And, at our stamp, here o'er and o'er one falls;
He murder cries and help from Athens calls.
Their sense thus weak, lost with their fears
thus strong,
Made senseless things begin to do them wrong;
For briers and thorns at their apparel snatch;
Some sleeves, some hats, from yielders all
things catch.
I led them on in this distracted fear,
And left sweet Pyramus translated there:
When in that moment, so it came to pass,
Titania waked and straightway loved an ass.

帕克
仙后娘娘爱上了一个怪物。
当她正昏昏然沉睡于梦乡,
她隐秘神圣的鲜花卧榻旁,
来了一帮粗俗不堪的蠢人,
这些工匠在雅典街上谋生。
他们聚在一起排练一出剧,
要在忒修斯婚礼那天演出。
他们当中最蠢的那个傻子,
在这出戏里扮演皮拉摩斯,
他演戏间歇走入一片林子,
这等良机我岂能失之交臂。
我在他头上扣了个驴脑袋,
他等下要上台回应提斯柏。
我们这位蹩脚演员又来了,
人们一看见他就惊慌失措,
好像瞥见狡猾猎人的雁群,
被枪声惊起鸣叫的灰鸦们,
没命地掠过天空四处逃散,
同伴们看见他都东逃西窜,
听到我们的脚步就吓趴了,
有人喊杀人了雅典救命哇。
他们衰弱的理智丧于恐惧,
没知觉的东西也乘虚而入;
荆棘和利刺拽他们的衣服,
他们任由袖子帽子被扯去。
我带着这帮胆小鬼们乱跑,
让皮拉摩斯呆那变成驴脑。
泰坦尼娅就在那时候睡醒,
立刻就对一头驴一见钟情。

OBERON
This falls out better than I could devise.
But hast thou yet latch'd the Athenian's eyes
With the love-juice, as I did bid thee do?

奥布朗
这结局可比我设想得更妙。
你可依我所嘱把爱液滴到
那个绝情的雅典人眼皮上?

PUCK
I took him sleeping,--that is finish'd too,--
And the Athenian woman by his side:
That, when he waked, of force she must be eyed.

帕克
他在梦里时,我把这桩事办妥了。
那雅典女子就躺在他边上。
等他醒来,必定会瞧见那姑娘。

Enter HERMIA and DEMETRIUS 荷米娅和狄米特律斯上

OBERON
Stand close: this is the same Athenian.

奥布朗
靠近我些:这就是我说的那个雅典人。

PUCK
This is the woman, but not this the man.

帕克
这姑娘正是我说的那位,可这男子却不是。

DEMETRIUS
O, why rebuke you him that loves you so?
Lay breath so bitter on your bitter foe.

狄米特律斯
唉,别人那么爱你,你干嘛这么凶巴巴?
对你的仇敌,才需要恶言相向嘛。

HERMIA
Now I but chide; but I should use thee worse,
For thou, I fear, hast given me cause to curse,
If thou hast slain Lysander in his sleep,
Being o'er shoes in blood, plunge in the deep,
And kill me too.
The sun was not so true unto the day
As he to me: would he have stolen away
From sleeping Hermia? I'll believe as soon
This whole earth may be bored and that the moon
May through the centre creep and so displease
Her brother's noontide with Antipodes.
It cannot be but thou hast murder'd him;
So should a murderer look, so dead, so grim.

荷米娅
只是凶你几句;我该更厉声厉气,
恐怕你让我有充足理由来诅咒你。
你若在拉山德睡着时乘机杀了他,
那你一不做二不休把我也干掉吧,
反正你手上已沾满了鲜血。
他对我的忠诚远超过太阳对白昼,
他难道会趁我熟睡时偷偷得溜走?
想让我相信拉山德狠心将我弃抛,
除非穿过地球正中凿出一条隧道,
让月亮姑娘从地球一头钻到那头,
去冒犯她那烈日当空的兄长白昼。
这唯一的可能就是你杀了拉山德,
瞧你一脸凶手残酷相,面无血色。

DEMETRIUS
So should the murder'd look, and so should I,
Pierced through the heart with your stern cruelty:
Yet you, the murderer, look as bright, as clear,
As yonder Venus in her glimmering sphere.

狄米特律斯
被害人就该这模样,像我这般,
我的心已被你无情的残酷刺穿。
而你这凶手看上去却晶莹灿烂,
就像天上的金星那么明亮耀眼。

HERMIA
What's this to my Lysander? where is he?
Ah, good Demetrius, wilt thou give him me?

荷米娅
这跟我的拉山德有何相干?他在哪呀?
好狄米特律斯,快把他还给我,好吗?

DEMETRIUS
I had rather give his carcass to my hounds.

狄米特律斯
我宁愿把他的尸骨丢给我的猎狗。

HERMIA
Out, dog! out, cur! thou drivest me past the bounds
Of maiden's patience. Hast thou slain him, then?
Henceforth be never number'd among men!
O, once tell true, tell true, even for my sake!
Durst thou have look'd upon him being awake,
And hast thou kill'd him sleeping? O brave touch!
Could not a worm, an adder, do so much?
An adder did it; for with doubler tongue
Than thine, thou serpent, never adder stung.

荷米娅
疯狗杂种,滚开!我所有姑娘家
的耐心被你逼没了。你真杀了他?
那从此往后就别把自己当人看了。
看在我面上,你就说一回真话吧!
你是不是不敢在他醒着时面对他,
就趁他睡着时杀他?多有胆量哇!
一条蛇能够轻而易举地做得到嘛?
是,一条蛇杀了他,你这毒蛇啊,
舌头分叉的蛇也不及你心狠手辣。

DEMETRIUS
You spend your passion on a misprised mood:
I am not guilty of Lysander's blood;
Nor is he dead, for aught that I can tell.

狄米特律斯
没啥理由,你就大喊大叫。
我可没碰拉山德一根毫毛。
而且据我所知,他并没死。

HERMIA
I pray thee, tell me then that he is well.

荷米娅
求求你,告诉我他完好无恙。

DEMETRIUS
An if I could, what should I get therefore?

狄米特律斯
我要是讲了,你拿什么酬谢我?

HERMIA
A privilege never to see me more.
And from thy hated presence part I so:
See me no more, whether he be dead or no.

荷米娅
不再见我就是赏你的特别待遇。
我再也不要看见你可憎的面目,
你别再见我,不管他是死是活。

Exit 荷米娅下

DEMETRIUS
There is no following her in this fierce vein:
Here therefore for a while I will remain.
So sorrow's heaviness doth heavier grow
For debt that bankrupt sleep doth sorrow owe:
Which now in some slight measure it will pay,
If for his tender here I make some stay.
Lies down and sleeps

狄米特律斯
她怒气冲冲,不跟着她为妙,
我正好停下来在这儿歇歇脚。
心头的伤感愈来愈不堪重载,
因睡眠不足欠了不少忧郁债。
我现在不妨在此地和衣露宿,
也算是略略偿还所欠的债务。
(躺下卧眠)

OBERON
What hast thou done? thou hast mistaken quite
And laid the love-juice on some true-love's sight:
Of thy misprision must perforce ensue
Some true love turn'd and not a false turn'd true.

奥布朗
你都做了些什么啊?你彻底搞砸了,
把爱液滴到真心相爱的人眼皮上了。
你的错必会产生后果,忠诚之真爱
将幡然改途,虚假之爱却依然故态。

PUCK
Then fate o'er-rules, that, one man holding troth,
A million fail, confounding oath on oath.

帕克
那是命运在操纵。世上有一个人信守诺言,
就有一百万个人背弃山盟海誓,移情别恋。

OBERON
About the wood go swifter than the wind,
And Helena of Athens look thou find:
All fancy-sick she is and pale of cheer,
With sighs of love, that costs the fresh blood dear:
By some illusion see thou bring her here:
I'll charm his eyes against she do appear.

奥布朗
要比风儿还快,你跑到林中各方,
找寻一个名叫海丽娜的雅典姑娘。
她备受爱情折磨,面色苍白如纸,
痴情的叹息衰耗了她宝贵的血气。
你想法使个花招把她带到我跟前,
我要给他两眼施魔力以备她出现。

PUCK
I go, I go; look how I go,
Swifter than arrow from the Tartar's bow.

帕克
我这就去,我这就去;你看
我的飞毛腿赛过鞑靼人的箭。

Exit 帕克

OBERON
(squeezing flower juice into DEMETRIUS ’s eyes)
Flower of this purple dye,
Hit with Cupid's archery,
Sink in apple of his eye.
When his love he doth espy,
Let her shine as gloriously
As the Venus of the sky.
When thou wakest, if she be by,
Beg of her for remedy.

奥布朗
(将花液滴到狄米特律斯眼上)
爱神丘比特的利箭,
射穿这紫色的花瓣,
花液在他眼底沉淀。
当那姑娘现身眼前,
她将如天上金星般,
熠熠生辉光芒璀璨。
醒来时她若在身畔,
求她成全你的爱恋。

Re-enter PUCK 帕克重上

PUCK
Captain of our fairy band,
Helena is here at hand;
And the youth, mistook by me,
Pleading for a lover's fee.
Shall we their fond pageant see?
Lord, what fools these mortals be!

帕克
启禀咱们仙境大王,
海丽娜已带至近旁。
我认错的那小青年,
苦苦乞求她的爱恋。
我们不妨看出好戏?
这些凡人蠢得要死!


OBERON
Stand aside: the noise they make
Will cause Demetrius to awake.

奥布朗
先呆一旁:他们这么大声
会把狄米特律斯吵醒。

PUCK
Then will two at once woo one;
That must needs be sport alone;
And those things do best please me
That befal preposterously.

帕克
那就成了双凤求凰,
这出好戏可真够棒。
此等情形荒诞离奇,
最能令我兴奋不已。

Enter LYSANDER and HELENA 拉山德与海丽娜上

LYSANDER
Why should you think that I should woo in scorn?
Scorn and derision never come in tears:
Look, when I vow, I weep; and vows so born,
In their nativity all truth appears.
How can these things in me seem scorn to you,
Bearing the badge of faith, to prove them true?

拉山德
我求爱是戏弄你,你为何这么看?
轻蔑和嘲笑之举何曾会泪流满面。
你看啊,我发誓之时不由得哭泣,
由此诞生的誓约绝没有一丝不实。
你怎能把我这诚挚的情感当嘲讽,
我又如何向你证明我的一片真情?

HELENA
You do advance your cunning more and more.
When truth kills truth, O devilish-holy fray!
These vows are Hermia's: will you give her o'er?
Weigh oath with oath, and you will nothing weigh:
Your vows to her and me, put in two scales,
Will even weigh, and both as light as tales.

海丽娜
拉山德,你真是愈来愈狡猾善辩。
当真相残杀真相,圣洁与魔鬼大战!
这些誓言属于荷米娅。你要将她抛弃?
把誓言与誓言相比,你的话一文不值:
把你对我和她的誓言,分放秤的两端,
一点份量都秤不出,两者都空如谎言。

LYSANDER
I had no judgment when to her I swore.

拉山德
我向她发誓时,没一点理智。

HELENA
Nor none, in my mind, now you give her o'er.

荷米娅
依我看,你现在抛弃她,也毫无理智。

LYSANDER
Demetrius loves her, and he loves not you.

拉山德
狄米特律斯只爱荷米娅,不爱你。

DEMETRIUS
[Awaking] O Helena, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine!
To what, my love, shall I compare thine eyne?
Crystal is muddy. O, how ripe in show
Thy lips, those kissing cherries, tempting grow!
That pure congealed white, high Taurus snow,
Fann'd with the eastern wind, turns to a crow
When thou hold'st up thy hand: O, let me kiss
This princess of pure white, this seal of bliss!

狄米特律斯 (醒来)
啊海丽娜,完美的女神圣洁的神仙!
我的爱,该拿什么比拟你明亮的眼?
水晶不够清澈。啊,你成熟的双唇,
像两粒热烈的樱桃,生得那么诱人!
当你举起皎皎玉手,积雪的金牛山
被东风刮过,就如乌鸦黑茫茫一片。
啊,请让我亲吻这洁白无瑕的公主,
你是快乐的象征,你将带给我幸福!

HELENA
O spite! O hell! I see you all are bent
To set against me for your merriment:
If you were civil and knew courtesy,
You would not do me thus much injury.
Can you not hate me, as I know you do,
But you must join in souls to mock me too?
If you were men, as men you are in show,
You would not use a gentle lady so;
To vow, and swear, and superpraise my parts,
When I am sure you hate me with your hearts.
You both are rivals, and love Hermia;
And now both rivals, to mock Helena:
A trim exploit, a manly enterprise,
To conjure tears up in a poor maid's eyes
With your derision! none of noble sort
Would so offend a virgin, and extort
A poor soul's patience, all to make you sport.

海丽娜
晦气!见鬼!我看你俩一样
打定主意要取笑耍弄本姑娘:
你们要是还有点教养懂礼仪,
就不会做出这么伤害我的事。
你们恨我就罢了,这我清楚,
俩男人却还要联手将我羞辱?
你们若有男人风范表里一致,
就不会这样对待一个弱女子;
你们对我又是发誓又是吹捧,
可你们打心里恨我,我断定。
你们俩是情敌,都爱荷米娅,
如今却竞相来讥笑我海丽娜:
多妙的主意呀,多男人气概,
一个可怜女子忍不住哭起来,
就因为你们俩人的恶意欺辱!
哪个高尚人会为了自己欢娱,
把一个闺女家逼到崩溃地步。


LYSANDER
You are unkind, Demetrius; be not so;
For you love Hermia; this you know I know:
And here, with all good will, with all my heart,
In Hermia's love I yield you up my part;
And yours of Helena to me bequeath,
Whom I do love and will do till my death.

拉山德
狄米特律斯,请不要太过分太残忍;
你知道我明白你对荷米娅一往情深:
在此,我自觉自愿,并且诚心诚意,
放弃对荷米娅的感情,成全她和你;
你也应当让出对海丽娜的那份情感,
我深爱着海丽娜,爱到我生命凋残。


HELENA
Never did mockers waste more idle breath.

海丽娜
哪个嘲笑者会这么枉费口舌。

DEMETRIUS
Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none:
If e'er I loved her, all that love is gone.
My heart to her but as guest-wise sojourn'd,
And now to Helen is it home return'd,
There to remain.

狄米特律斯
拉山德,荷米娅你留着吧;我不要:
如果我爱过她,那些爱已云散烟消。
我对她的爱如客人般只是一坐之间,
现在我的心已重归海丽娜,爱之轩,
并将永远守在那儿。

LYSANDER
Helen, it is not so.

拉山德
海伦,他一派胡言。

DEMETRIUS
Disparage not the faith thou dost not know,
Lest, to thy peril, thou aby it dear.
Look, where thy love comes; yonder is thy dear.

狄米特律斯
不要蔑视你不知晓的信念,
免得你为此付出惨重的代价。
瞧,你的爱人来了,就在那边。

Re-enter HERMIA 荷米娅重上

HERMIA
Dark night, that from the eye his function takes,
The ear more quick of apprehension makes;
Wherein it doth impair the seeing sense,
It pays the hearing double recompense.
Thou art not by mine eye, Lysander, found;
Mine ear, I thank it, brought me to thy sound
But why unkindly didst thou leave me so?

荷米娅
黑夜让眼睛失明,
让耳朵更加聪灵;
虽然视觉有阻障,
听觉被加倍补偿。
拉山德,我的眼找不到你,
多亏我的耳带我闻声而至,
你究竟因何狠心弃我而去?

LYSANDER
Why should he stay, whom love doth press to go?

拉山德
爱情推他走,他焉能滞足?

HERMIA
What love could press Lysander from my side?

荷米娅
什么爱情能把拉山德推离我身旁?


LYSANDER
Lysander's love, that would not let him bide,
Fair Helena, who more engilds the night
Than all you fiery oes and eyes of light.
Why seek'st thou me? could not this make thee know,
The hate I bear thee made me leave thee so?

拉山德
拉山德的爱人让他不能滞留,
美丽的海丽娜,让暗夜璀璨
比那些明亮的星光还要耀眼。
你为何来找我?你还不明白?
我憎恨你,所以我才会离开。

HERMIA
You speak not as you think: it cannot be.

荷米娅
你言不由衷。这不可能。

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin'd all three
To fashion this false sport, in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia! most ungrateful maid!
Have you conspired, have you with these contrived
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shared,
The sisters' vows, the hours that we have spent,
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us,--O, is it all forgot?
All school-days' friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods,
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices and minds,
Had been incorporate. So we grow together,
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So, with two seeming bodies, but one heart;
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crowned with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, 'tis not maidenly:
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

海丽娜
哇,她和他们是一伙的!
现在我看明白了,他们仨合伙
玩这鬼把戏,来算计我。
害人精荷米娅!最忘恩负义的小妮子!
你竟同他们串通一气
用这种卑鄙伎俩来捉弄我,诱我上钩?
我们之间所有的心灵契语,
我俩结为姊妹的盟约,那些个
只恨光阴脚步匆匆不愿道别的时光,
--- 噢,你统统忘了?
所有的同学友情,和童年天真,也都不记得了?
荷米娅,你和我就像两个富有创意的神,
你一针我一线,同绣一朵花,
合描一个图样,共坐一张垫子,
同吟一首歌儿,同唱一个音符,
就好像我们的手,我们的身体,我们的声音和灵魂
都紧密相连。我们就这样一起生长,
仿佛两粒并蒂樱桃,看上去是分开的,
实则成双成对,
是嵌在一根茎上的两粒可爱的樱桃;
如此,看似两个身体,却合用一颗心;
两个身体好比两枚不同的盾徽分属夫妻二人,
而心好比纹章冠上的同一顶饰。
你想撕碎我们多年来的情谊,
而和这两个男人合伙来讥笑你可怜的朋友么?
这么做既背弃友情,也不够淑女:
虽然只有我本人会受到伤害,
但我们全体女性,包括我自己,都会为此谴责你。

(”Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,"--- 见注1)


HERMIA
I am amazed at your passionate words.
I scorn you not: it seems that you scorn me.

荷米娅
你的激情言语真让我大吃一惊。
我并没有嘲笑你,倒是觉得你在讥讽我呢。


HELENA
Have you not set Lysander, as in scorn,
To follow me and praise my eyes and face?
And made your other love, Demetrius,
Who even but now did spurn me with his foot,
To call me goddess, nymph, divine and rare,
Precious, celestial? Wherefore speaks he this
To her he hates? and wherefore doth Lysander
Deny your love, so rich within his soul,
And tender me, forsooth, affection,
But by your setting on, by your consent?
What thought I be not so in grace as you,
So hung upon with love, so fortunate,
But miserable most, to love unloved?
This you should pity rather than despise.

海丽娜
你派拉山德来捉弄我,让他四处跟踪我,
假惺惺地赞美我的眼睛和面孔,这你否认吗?
你的另一个情人狄米特律斯,刚把我一脚踢开,
一转身就又称我是女神、仙女,吹捧我多么神圣、罕见、
珍贵、非凡,他难道不也是你撺掇的?
狄米特律斯为什么赞美他憎恶的姑娘?
拉山德的灵魂里溢满你的爱,却为何要甩掉你,
而向我倾奉他的情感?
除非经你同意,受你唆使?
尽管我不像你那么蒙受恩典,
不被爱情眷顾,也不怎么走运,
我爱的人不爱我,我痛苦之至,但那又怎样呢?
你该同情我才是,可你却轻视我。


HELENA
Ay, do, persever, counterfeit sad looks,
Make mouths upon me when I turn my back;
Wink each at other; hold the sweet jest up:
This sport, well carried, shall be chronicled.
If you have any pity, grace, or manners,
You would not make me such an argument.
But fare ye well: 'tis partly my own fault;
Which death or absence soon shall remedy.

海丽娜
哎,那就接着表演吧,装出一副伤心模样,
待我一转身,即刻对着我后背又是扮鬼脸,
又是互相使眼色;就让这美妙的游戏持续出彩:
既然这游戏策划得这么好,真该大写特写记一笔。
倘若你们还有恻隐之心,有教养,懂礼貌,
就不该拿我恶作剧。
还是说再见吧:弄到这地步,我也有错,
死亡或离去将很快补偿一切过失。


LYSANDER
Stay, gentle Helena; hear my excuse:
My love, my life my soul, fair Helena!

拉山德
别走,温柔的海利娜;请听我解释:
我的爱,我的生命我的灵魂,美丽的海丽娜!

HELENA
O excellent!

海丽娜
啊多么动听!

HERMIA
Sweet, do not scorn her so.

荷米娅
亲爱的拉山德,别这么嘲讽她。

DEMETRIUS
If she cannot entreat, I can compel.

狄米特律斯
如果荷米娅的恳求不管用,我只好强迫你停止胡说八道。

LYSANDER
Thou canst compel no more than she entreat:
Thy threats have no more strength than her weak prayers.
Helen, I love thee; by my life, I do:
I swear by that which I will lose for thee,
To prove him false that says I love thee not.

拉山德
你的强迫不比她的恳求更管用:
你的威胁,她的祷告,都同样软弱无力。
海伦,我爱你。我以我的生命起誓:
我发誓我愿意为你献出我的生命,
来证实“我不爱你”只是他口中的谎言。


DEMETRIUS
I say I love thee more than he can do.

狄米特律斯
我得说,我比他更爱你。

LYSANDER
If thou say so, withdraw, and prove it too.

拉山德
如果你这么说,那就拔剑决斗,来证实你的话吧。

DEMETRIUS
Quick, come!

狄米特律斯
那就快来吧!

HERMIA
Lysander, whereto tends all this?

荷米娅
拉山德,你这是要做什么呀?

LYSANDER
Away, you Ethiope!

拉山德
走开,你这黑女人!

DEMETRIUS
(to HERMIA)
    No, no. He’ll
Seem to break loose.
(to LYSANDER)
  Take on as you would follow,
But yet come not. You are a tame man, go!

狄米特律斯
(对荷米娅说) 别走,别走。看样子他想溜走。
(对拉山德说) 假装要跟我,却又不过来。你这胆小鬼,滚开!

LYSANDER
(to HERMIA) Hang off, thou cat, thou burr! Vile thing, let loose
Or I will shake thee from me like a serpent.

拉山德
(对荷米娅说) 放开我,你这猫,你这刺!
不要脸的东西,松开手,不然我会把你甩开,就像甩掉一条蛇。

HERMIA
Why are you grown so rude? What change is this,
Sweet love,--

荷米娅
你怎么变得这么粗暴无礼?
亲爱的,这是怎么回事?

LYSANDER
Thy love! out, tawny Tartar, out!
Out, loathed medicine! hated potion, hence!

拉山德
你的爱人!褐色的鞑靼人,滚开!
你这讨厌可恶的毒药,滚开!

HERMIA
Do you not jest?

荷米娅
你是在开玩笑吧?

HELENA
Yes, sooth; and so do you.

海丽娜
对,他和你都在开玩笑。

LYSANDER
Demetrius, I will keep my word with thee.

拉山德
狄米特律斯,我一定信守对你的诺言。

DEMETRIUS
I would I had your bond, for I perceive
A weak bond holds you: I'll not trust your word.

狄米特律斯
我但愿手里有你的保证书,因为据我观察,
你不大守信,所以你的话我信不过。

LYSANDER
What, should I hurt her, strike her, kill her dead?
Although I hate her, I'll not harm her so.

拉山德
什么?我应该伤害她,殴打她,杀死她?
没错,我恨她,但我不会那么样去伤害她。

HERMIA
What, can you do me greater harm than hate?
Hate me! wherefore? O me! what news, my love!
Am not I Hermia? are not you Lysander?
I am as fair now as I was erewhile.
Since night you loved me; yet since night you left
me:
Why, then you left me--O, the gods forbid!--
In earnest, shall I say?

荷米娅
有什么伤害(像殴打我,杀死我)比你恨我更致命?
恨我!为什么?天哪!我的爱,究竟出了什么事?
难道我不再是荷米娅了?你也不再是拉山德了?
我同过去的我一样美丽。
就在昨夜你还爱着我;也是在昨夜你离开我:
我该不该说,你是真的有意离开我? ---
啊上帝,但愿不是这么回事!

LYSANDER
Ay, by my life;
And never did desire to see thee more.
Therefore be out of hope, of question, of doubt;
Be certain, nothing truer; 'tis no jest
That I do hate thee and love Helena.

拉山德
正是这样,
我从来都不想再看见你。
你把所有念想和疑问都抛掉吧。
这是真的,我不开玩笑,
我恨你,我爱海丽娜。

HERMIA
O me!
(TO HELENA) You juggler! You canker-blossom!
You thief of love! what, have you come by night
And stolen my love's heart from him?

荷米娅
天哪!
(对海丽娜) 你这骗子!你这蛀花虫!
你这爱情盗贼!哼,你夜里溜来,
偷走了我爱人的心, 是不是?

HELENA
Fine, i'faith!
Have you no modesty, no maiden shame,
No touch of bashfulness? What, will you tear
Impatient answers from my gentle tongue?
Fie, fie! you counterfeit, you puppet, you!

海丽娜
妙,真妙!
你怎么不懂礼貌,全无女孩家的羞辱心,
也一点不觉得害臊?哼,你想从我温柔的舌尖
逼出急不择言的回答?
呸,呸!你这冒充朋友的骗子,你这任人操纵的玩偶!

HERMIA
Puppet? why so? ay, that way goes the game.
Now I perceive that she hath made compare
Between our statures; she hath urged her height;
And with her personage, her tall personage,
Her height, forsooth, she hath prevail'd with him.
And are you grown so high in his esteem;
Because I am so dwarfish and so low?
How low am I, thou painted maypole? speak;
How low am I? I am not yet so low
But that my nails can reach unto thine eyes.

荷米娅
玩偶? 为什么这么说? 哦,在玩那套把戏。
我现在意识到她在拿我俩的身高说事;
她为自己的身高洋洋自得,
凭着她的身材,她那高挑的身材,
她的确占了上风,赢得了他的欢心。
是不是因为我个子特别矮,
他就因此格外高看你?
我有多矮?你这花里胡哨的五朔节花柱,说呀。
我有多矮?我还没有矮到
手指甲抓不到你的眼珠子。

HELENA
(to LYSANDER and DEMETRIUS)
I pray you, though you mock me, gentlemen,
Let her not hurt me: I was never curst;
I have no gift at all in shrewishness;
I am a right maid for my cowardice:
Let her not strike me. You perhaps may think,
Because she is something lower than myself,
That I can match her.

海丽娜
(对拉山德和狄米特律斯)
先生们,尽管你们嘲笑我,我还是要求你们,
请别让她伤到我,我从来不耍脾气,
泼妇骂街的本事我一点也没有;
我还是个胆子超小的正宗淑女,
别让她打我。你们不要以为,
她个子比我矮些,
我就是她的对手。

HERMIA
Lower! hark, again.

荷米娅
比她矮!听,她又来这一套了。

HELENA
Good Hermia, do not be so bitter with me.
I evermore did love you, Hermia,
Did ever keep your counsels, never wrong'd you;
Save that, in love unto Demetrius,
I told him of your stealth unto this wood.
He follow'd you; for love I follow'd him;
But he hath chid me hence and threaten'd me
To strike me, spurn me, nay, to kill me too:
And now, so you will let me quiet go,
To Athens will I bear my folly back
And follow you no further: let me go:
You see how simple and how fond I am.

海丽娜
好荷米娅,别这么跟我过不去。
荷米娅,我从前一直爱着你,
我一向保守你的秘密,从未做过伤害你的事,
除了这次,出于爱情,
我把你私奔到林子里的事告诉了狄米特律斯 。
他跟踪你,我又为爱跟踪他;
但他责骂我,
还威胁说要打我踢我,甚至说要杀我。
现在,你就让我悄悄离开这儿吧,
我会带着我的愚蠢回到雅典,
我再也不跟踪你了,你高抬贵手放我走吧,
你瞧我多缺心眼多傻瓜。

HERMIA
Why, get you gone: who is't that hinders you?

荷米娅
好哇,说走就走呀,谁挡着你了?

HELENA
A foolish heart, that I leave here behind.

海丽娜
一颗愚蠢的心,我把它就留在这儿吧。

HERMIA
What, with Lysander?

荷米娅
嗯,留给拉山德?

HELENA
With Demetrius.

海丽娜
留给狄米特律斯。

LYSANDER
Be not afraid; she shall not harm thee, Helena.

拉山德
别怕。海丽娜,她不会伤害你。

DEMETRIUS
(to LYSANDER)
No, sir, she shall not, though you take her part.

狄米特律斯
(对拉山德)
先生,荷米娅她不会伤害海利娜的,即使你同荷米娅合伙。

HELENA
O, when she's angry, she is keen and shrewd!
She was a vixen when she went to school;
And though she be but little, she is fierce.

海丽娜
哎呀,她发起火来,凶得不得了!
当时在学校,她就是个好斗的雌狐狸,
别看她人小,厉害着哪。

HERMIA
'Little' again! nothing but 'low' and 'little'!
Why will you suffer her to flout me thus?
Let me come to her.

又是“小”!“矮”和“小”!翻来覆去就这俩字。
你为什么容忍她这么嘲笑我?
看我跟她过招。

LYSANDER
Get you gone, you dwarf;
You minimus, of hindering knot-grass made;
You bead, you acorn.

拉山德
快滚,你这矮子;
你这矬子,吃了妨碍发育的两耳草,
你这小珠子,你这小橡子。

DEMETRIUS
You are too officious
In her behalf that scorns your services.
Let her alone: speak not of Helena;
Take not her part; for, if thou dost intend
Never so little show of love to her,
Thou shalt aby it.

狄米特律斯
你越俎代庖了吧,
人家海丽娜哪要你帮忙。
你不要烦她,也不要把她挂在嘴边;
她不需要你做靠山;你要是
再向她示爱,哪怕就一点点,
有你好果子吃。

LYSANDER
Now she holds me not;
Now follow, if thou darest, to try whose right,
Of thine or mine, is most in Helena.

拉山德
荷米娅现在罩不住我了。
你要是有种,现在就跟我来,
看看海丽娜究竟该归谁。

DEMETRIUS
Follow? nay, I'll go with thee, cheek by jole.
Exeunt LYSANDER and DEMETRIUS

狄米特律斯
跟你后头? 没门。我俩一道走,脸贴脸。

Exeunt LYSANDER and DEMETRIUS

拉山德和狄米特律斯下

HERMIA
You, mistress, all this coil is 'long of you:
Nay, go not back.

荷米娅
小姐,瞧你惹得这些麻烦。
你呆这儿别走。

HELENA
I will not trust you, I,
Nor longer stay in your curst company.
Your hands than mine are quicker for a fray,
My legs are longer though, to run away.

海丽娜
我才不信任你呢,
谁要跟你这凶巴巴的人做伴。
打架时,你出手比我快,
逃跑时,还是我腿长脚快。

Exit 海丽娜下

HERMIA
I am amazed, and know not what to say.

荷米娅
这太让我吃惊了,我简直不知道该说什么。

Exit 荷米娅下


OBERON
This is thy negligence: still thou mistakest,
Or else committ'st thy knaveries wilfully.

奥布朗
都怪你大意:老是出错,
没准是存心添乱啊。

PUCK
Believe me, king of shadows, I mistook.
Did not you tell me I should know the man
By the Athenian garment be had on?
And so far blameless proves my enterprise,
That I have 'nointed an Athenian's eyes;
And so far am I glad it so did sort
As this their jangling I esteem a sport.

帕克
相信我,仙王,我是搞砸了。
不是你明示我瞧见雅典衣裳
就能够一眼认出那个负心郎?
这么说来我办事没出差错嘛,
我把花液滴到雅典人眼上了。
我很高兴事情弄到这般结果,
他们这么吵闹不休真够娱乐。

OBERON
Thou see'st these lovers seek a place to fight:
Hie therefore, Robin, overcast the night;
The starry welkin cover thou anon
With drooping fog as black as Acheron,
And lead these testy rivals so astray
As one come not within another's way.
Like to Lysander sometime frame thy tongue,
Then stir Demetrius up with bitter wrong;
And sometime rail thou like Demetrius;
And from each other look thou lead them thus,
Till o'er their brows death-counterfeiting sleep
With leaden legs and batty wings doth creep:
Then crush this herb into Lysander's eye;
Whose liquor hath this virtuous property,
To take from thence all error with his might,
And make his eyeballs roll with wonted sight.
When they next wake, all this derision
Shall seem a dream and fruitless vision,
And back to Athens shall the lovers wend,
With league whose date till death shall never end.
Whiles I in this affair do thee employ,
I'll to my queen and beg her Indian boy;
And then I will her charmed eye release
From monster's view, and all things shall be peace.

奥布朗
你瞧俩情敌在找地方决一死战,
罗宾,你快快拉下黑暗的幕帘;
用黑如地狱阿克伦河般的浓雾,
立刻将这繁星满天的夜空遮住,
引得这俩好斗的冤家晕头转向,
让他们在林子里无法撞到对方。
你时而卷动舌头学拉山德大叫,
辱骂狄米特律斯让他如雷暴跳;
时而模仿狄米特律斯开口大骂,
就这样把二人分开,让他们俩
拖着灌铅的腿和蝙蝠般的翅膀,
直到那死一般的睡眠爬到额上;
那时就把花汁挤到拉山德眼上,
这花液真的奇妙非凡功效显彰,
它能解除施加于他的感官幻觉,
让他的眼睛恢复正常视力如昨。
当他们醒来时,这场愚蠢嘲弄,
即如一场梦,一幕虚无的幻影。
这些情人们然后就回到雅典城,
结盟约发誓永不分离相爱一生。
我即刻就差你前去打理这桩事,
而我去会仙后向她讨印度童子。
接着从她眼里赶走怪物的虚幻,
那么问题解决一切都重归平安。


PUCK
My fairy lord, this must be done with haste,
For night's swift dragons cut the clouds full fast,
And yonder shines Aurora's harbinger;
At whose approach, ghosts, wandering here and there,
Troop home to churchyards: damned spirits all,
That in crossways and floods have burial,
Already to their wormy beds are gone;
For fear lest day should look their shames upon,
They willfully themselves exile from light
And must for aye consort with black-brow'd night.

帕克
大王,这事一点不敢耽误,
迅疾的夜龙即将撕开云幕,
天边已闪耀着黎明的星辰,
晨曦将临,游荡的鬼魂们,
都正赶回他们的教堂墓茔,
那些薨于路口水底的幽灵,
也都返回蛆虫蠕动的墓床,
生怕他们的耻辱曝于阳光,
他们选择放逐自绝于白昼,
只能永远与漆黑暗夜相守。

OBERON
But we are spirits of another sort:
I with the morning's love have oft made sport,
And, like a forester, the groves may tread,
Even till the eastern gate, all fiery-red,
Opening on Neptune with fair blessed beams,
Turns into yellow gold his salt green streams.
But, notwithstanding, haste; make no delay:
We may effect this business yet ere day.

奥布朗
但我们不同,我们是另类精灵:
我常同黎明的情人狩猎于丛林,
我像林间野夫般在树林间游荡,
直到东天门上升起火红的太阳,
在大海上投下美丽吉祥的亮光,
让尼普顿碧蓝的咸海万顷金黄。
闲话少说,抓紧时间不得延迟,
在天亮前我们可以办好这桩事。

(with the morning's love--- 见注2)


Exit 奥布朗下

PUCK
Up and down, up and down,
I will lead them up and down:
I am fear'd in field and town:
Goblin, lead them up and down.
Here comes one.

帕克
忽左忽右到处走,
带着他们乱转悠,
城野人人怕小妖,
弄得他们晕了头。
那二人中的一人来了。

Re-enter LYSANDER 拉山德重上

LYSANDER
Where art thou, proud Demetrius? speak thou now.

拉山德
你在哪儿, 骄傲的狄米特律斯? 快开口。

PUCK
Here, villain; drawn and ready. Where art thou?

帕克
你这混帐,我在这儿呢;我已拔剑恭候。你在哪儿?

LYSANDER
I will be with thee straight.

拉山德
我这就来了。

PUCK
Follow me, then,
To plainer ground.

帕克
那好,跟我来,我们找块稍平的地方对决。

Exit LYSANDER, as following the voice

拉山德随声而下

Re-enter DEMETRIUS 狄米特律斯重上

DEMETRIUS
Lysander! speak again:
Thou runaway, thou coward, art thou fled?
Speak! In some bush? Where dost thou hide thy head?

狄米特律斯
拉山德!咋又不开口了,你说话啊。
你跑掉了,你这懦夫,真的逃了?
快开口!躲到树丛里了?你小子把脑袋藏哪了?

PUCK
Thou coward, art thou bragging to the stars,
Telling the bushes that thou look'st for wars,
And wilt not come? Come, recreant; come, thou child;
I'll whip thee with a rod: he is defiled
That draws a sword on thee.

帕克
你这懦夫,尽对着星星夸口逞能,
还朝着树丛叫嚷要对决,
可却不肯过来应战? 来吧,胆小鬼;来吧,小孩家;
我只消用棍子抽你,谁若拿剑对付你
那可就掉份了。

DEMETRIUS
Yea, art thou there?

狄米特律斯
噢, 你在哪?

PUCK
Follow my voice: we'll try no manhood here.

帕克
跟着我的声音走,俩个大男人哪能在这儿决斗。

Exeunt 狄米特律斯和帕克下

Re-enter LYSANDER 拉山德重上

LYSANDER
He goes before me and still dares me on:
When I come where he calls, then he is gone.
The villain is much lighter-heel'd than I:
I follow'd fast, but faster he did fly;
That fallen am I in dark uneven way,
And here will rest me.
(Lies down)
Come, thou gentle day!
For if but once thou show me thy grey light,
I'll find Demetrius and revenge this spite.
Sleeps

拉山德
他走在我前面,还不停地激我跟上,
可等我赶到他说话的地方,他又没影了。
这家伙腿脚比我快多了:
我在后头紧追,可他逃得更快。
黑漆漆的,路又不平,我还摔了一跤,
干脆躺下来歇歇。
(躺下)
来吧,温柔的白昼!
一待你微光初放,
我就去找狄米特律斯那小子算账。

Re-enter PUCK and DEMETRIUS

帕克和狄米特律斯重上

PUCK
(as LYSANDER to DEMETRIUS)
Ho, ho, ho! Coward, why comest thou not?

帕克
(学拉山德说话)
哈哈哈!胆小鬼,你怎么还不过来?

DEMETRIUS
Abide me, if thou darest; for well I wot
Thou runn'st before me, shifting every place,
And darest not stand, nor look me in the face.
Where art thou now?

狄米特律斯
你要有种,就等着我。
你在我前头拼命跑,忽东忽西,
还不敢停下来,也不敢跟我面对面,咋回事我心里有数。
你现在何处?

PUCK
(as LYSANDER)
Come hither: I am here.

帕克
(学拉山德的声音)
过来,我在这儿呢。

DEMETRIUS
Nay, then, thou mock'st me. Thou shalt buy this dear,
If ever I thy face by daylight see:
Now, go thy way. Faintness constraineth me
To measure out my length on this cold bed.
By day's approach look to be visited.
(Lies down and sleeps)

狄米特律斯
哼,才不上当呢,你又在捉弄我。
要是天亮后看见你这张嘴脸,我叫你吃不了兜着走。
你现在快滚。我精疲力尽,
要倒在这冷冰冰的地上睡一觉。
天亮时,你等着我找你算账。
(躺下睡觉)

Re-enter HELENA 海丽娜重上


HELENA
O weary night, O long and tedious night,
Abate thy hour! Shine comforts from the east,
That I may back to Athens by daylight,
From these that my poor company detest:
And sleep, that sometimes shuts up sorrow's eye,
Steal me awhile from mine own company.
(Lies down and sleeps)

海丽娜
唉,疲倦的夜,你如此无聊漫长,
快快结束吧!让东方升起安慰之光,
让黎明伴我返回雅典,
远离这些憎恶我的人。
睡眠有时可以闭合哀伤之眼,
就让睡眠使我暂且抛却忧烦。
(躺下睡觉)

PUCK
Yet but three? Come one more;
Two of both kinds make up four.
Here she comes, curst and sad:
Cupid is a knavish lad,
Thus to make poor females mad.

帕克
三人在此,还差一人。
两对两类,凑成四人。
一女已到,愁容满面:
爱神小子,好为事端,
弄得女人,疯疯癫癫。

Re-enter HERMIA 荷米娅重上


HERMIA
Never so weary, never so in woe,
Bedabbled with the dew and torn with briers,
I can no further crawl, no further go;
My legs can keep no pace with my desires.
Here will I rest me till the break of day.
Heavens shield Lysander, if they mean a fray!
(Lies down and sleeps)

荷米娅
从未这么疲乏,从未这么感伤,
露水打湿全身,荆棘扯破衣裳,
我再也爬不动,我再也无力走,
两腿不听使唤,怎奈心愿难酬。
我要在此歇息,等待佛晓时刻。
他们若要决斗,愿天佑拉山德!
(躺下睡觉)


PUCK
On the ground
Sleep sound:
I'll apply
To your eye,
Gentle lover, remedy.
(Squeezing the juice on LYSANDER's eyes)
When thou wakest,
Thou takest
True delight
In the sight
Of thy former lady's eye:
And the country proverb known,
That every man should take his own,
In your waking shall be shown:
Jack shall have Jill;
Nought shall go ill;
The man shall have his mare again, and all shall be well.

帕克
你地当床已入黑甜乡,
我且将花汁滴你眼上,
让那些幻觉统统消亡。(把花液挤到拉山德眼上)
待你一觉醒来天蓝蓝,
旧爱花颜重映你眼帘。
乡俚俗语对此早断言,
人生归宿皆是命中缘。
你醒时当见鸳鸯戏水,
才子佳人终成天仙配,
失马复归得意轻蹄飞。

Exit 帕克下






【注1】
Helena says, ”.... with two seeming bodies, but one heart;
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crowned with one crest.“


Douce explains, "Helen says, 'we had two seeming bodies but only one heart.' She then exemplifies her position by a simile — 'we had two of the first, i.e. bodies, like double coats in heraldry that belong to man and wife as one person, but which, like our single heart, have but one crest.'"
http://www.shakespeare-online.com/plays/mids_3_2.html


coats in heraldry ---- see "Coat of arms" in wiki:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coat_of_arms


另,关于盾徽,网上有篇趣文:
酒瓶上的英国王室 by 俞天任:
http://mp.weixin.qq.com/s?__biz=MjM5NzQwNjcyMQ==&mid=10252054&idx=1&sn=1d1000809b7b9f708139416af0d6370a#rd


【注2】

http://www.shakespeare-online.com/plays/mids_3_2.html

the morning's love ---- "by the morning's love I apprehend Cephalus, the mighty hunter and paramour of Aurora, is intended" (Holt White)
        



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